Alumni Move Sigma Theta Phi Rock Back to Campus

A blue rock with the letters of the Sigma Theta Phi fraternity.
The Sigma Theta Phi fraternity rock has been repainted and moved to the LCCC campus.

A group of alumni who were part of the now defunct Sigma Theta Phi fraternity at Lorain County Community College were able to help attain a home for their rock that used to sit outside of their fraternity house during the 1960s. A core group of first-year members still live in the area and celebrated their 50th reunion Aug. 5 at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Elyria before visiting the rock near the Bass Library on campus.

Sigma Theta Phi fraternity began in 1967 with 19 charter members and was formally chartered by the college in the spring semester of 1968. The fraternity had over a hundred members from 1967-73. The social group enjoyed participating in intramural sports, community activities and college sponsored activities.

“For many of us the fraternity turned a routine school experience that could have seemed like another round of high school into a brotherhood filled with many exciting, humorous, embarrassing and wonderful times that we all remember to this day,” Bud Albright said.  “Many of our members met our future wives at LCCC and most of us went on to four-year degrees or more.”

Last winter a group of former fraternity members discovered their “fraternity rock” on the original fraternity house property at 316 Lowell Street in Elyria. Since member Bud Albright had worked as the director of the Bachelor’s Plus program and placements for Ashland University with LCCC’s University Partnership for nearly 10 years, he suggested he might know someone who could help bring the special rock back to LCCC grounds.

Area members were able to help move the rock from the property at Lake Avenue United Church of Christ in Elyria, the organization that the group originally rented the fraternity from decades ago. With the help of Jonathan Dryden, Ph.D., Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic and Learner Services, they were able to relocate the rock back to campus.

Alumni Move Sigma Theta Phi Rock Back to Campus

A blue rock with the letters of the Sigma Theta Phi fraternity.
The Sigma Theta Phi fraternity rock has been repainted and moved to the LCCC campus.

A group of alumni who were part of the now defunct Sigma Theta Phi fraternity at Lorain County Community College were able to help attain a home for their rock that used to sit outside of their fraternity house during the 1960s. A core group of first-year members still live in the area and celebrated their 50th reunion Aug. 5 at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Elyria before visiting the rock near the Bass Library on campus.

Sigma Theta Phi fraternity began in 1967 with 19 charter members and was formally chartered by the college in the spring semester of 1968. The fraternity had over a hundred members from 1967-73. The social group enjoyed participating in intramural sports, community activities and college sponsored activities.

“For many of us the fraternity turned a routine school experience that could have seemed like another round of high school into a brotherhood filled with many exciting, humorous, embarrassing and wonderful times that we all remember to this day,” Bud Albright said.  “Many of our members met our future wives at LCCC and most of us went on to four-year degrees or more.”

Last winter a group of former fraternity members discovered their “fraternity rock” on the original fraternity house property at 316 Lowell Street in Elyria. Since member Bud Albright had worked as the director of the Bachelor’s Plus program and placements for Ashland University with LCCC’s University Partnership for nearly 10 years, he suggested he might know someone who could help bring the special rock back to LCCC grounds.

Area members were able to help move the rock from the property at Lake Avenue United Church of Christ in Elyria, the organization that the group originally rented the fraternity from decades ago. With the help of Jonathan Dryden, Ph.D., Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic and Learner Services, they were able to relocate the rock back to campus.

Alumni Move Sigma Theta Phi Rock Back to Campus

A blue rock with the letters of the Sigma Theta Phi fraternity.
The Sigma Theta Phi fraternity rock has been repainted and moved to the LCCC campus.

A group of alumni who were part of the now defunct Sigma Theta Phi fraternity at Lorain County Community College were able to help attain a home for their rock that used to sit outside of their fraternity house during the 1960s. A core group of first-year members still live in the area and celebrated their 50th reunion Aug. 5 at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Elyria before visiting the rock near the Bass Library on campus.

Sigma Theta Phi fraternity began in 1967 with 19 charter members and was formally chartered by the college in the spring semester of 1968. The fraternity had over a hundred members from 1967-73. The social group enjoyed participating in intramural sports, community activities and college sponsored activities.

“For many of us the fraternity turned a routine school experience that could have seemed like another round of high school into a brotherhood filled with many exciting, humorous, embarrassing and wonderful times that we all remember to this day,” Bud Albright said.  “Many of our members met our future wives at LCCC and most of us went on to four-year degrees or more.”

Last winter a group of former fraternity members discovered their “fraternity rock” on the original fraternity house property at 316 Lowell Street in Elyria. Since member Bud Albright had worked as the director of the Bachelor’s Plus program and placements for Ashland University with LCCC’s University Partnership for nearly 10 years, he suggested he might know someone who could help bring the special rock back to LCCC grounds.

Area members were able to help move the rock from the property at Lake Avenue United Church of Christ in Elyria, the organization that the group originally rented the fraternity from decades ago. With the help of Jonathan Dryden, Ph.D., Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic and Learner Services, they were able to relocate the rock back to campus.

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