Early College High School Grad Succeeds with Double Major at 4-Year School

Gamaliel Narvaez, a 2014 graduate of Lorain County Early College High School is thriving after his success in the program. He was accepted for undergraduate studies at Harvard University but chose The Ohio State University instead. This May he will complete a double major in philosophy and political science.

The 21-year-old from Lorain plans to take a year off to prepare for his LSAT exam with the hopes of attending law school.

After finishing his associate of the arts through Early College High School, Narvaez became heavily involved at The Ohio State University. He completed an internship with Judges John and James Miraldi at the Lorain County Justice Center, made the Dean’s List every semester and plans to graduate with honors. He attributes some of his achievement to his experience with LCCC’s Early College High School.

“Being a part of Early College High School gave me incredible insight into the dynamics of a college environment, and I thank them every time I’m able to tell someone that I graduated high school with an associate degree,” Narvaez said.

“I turned a four-to-five year double major program into a three-year program for me. It saved me a lot of money and prepared me for serious deadlines, dealing with professors and interacting in groups with people of varying ages and social standings,” Narvaez said. He noted that the professors in the program were especially supportive.

The Early College High School is designed for first generation college students who will be the first in their families to graduate from college. Starting in ninth grade students participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and college associate degree at the same time. This year 300 students are participating in the program on the LCCC campus.

All courses are taught tuition free to allow younger students the ability to experience the college’s resources, laboratories, performing arts center, technology and non-traditional instructional strategies.

Early College High School Grad Succeeds with Double Major at 4-Year School

Gamaliel Narvaez, a 2014 graduate of Lorain County Early College High School is thriving after his success in the program. He was accepted for undergraduate studies at Harvard University but chose The Ohio State University instead. This May he will complete a double major in philosophy and political science.

The 21-year-old from Lorain plans to take a year off to prepare for his LSAT exam with the hopes of attending law school.

After finishing his associate of the arts through Early College High School, Narvaez became heavily involved at The Ohio State University. He completed an internship with Judges John and James Miraldi at the Lorain County Justice Center, made the Dean’s List every semester and plans to graduate with honors. He attributes some of his achievement to his experience with LCCC’s Early College High School.

“Being a part of Early College High School gave me incredible insight into the dynamics of a college environment, and I thank them every time I’m able to tell someone that I graduated high school with an associate degree,” Narvaez said.

“I turned a four-to-five year double major program into a three-year program for me. It saved me a lot of money and prepared me for serious deadlines, dealing with professors and interacting in groups with people of varying ages and social standings,” Narvaez said. He noted that the professors in the program were especially supportive.

The Early College High School is designed for first generation college students who will be the first in their families to graduate from college. Starting in ninth grade students participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and college associate degree at the same time. This year 300 students are participating in the program on the LCCC campus.

All courses are taught tuition free to allow younger students the ability to experience the college’s resources, laboratories, performing arts center, technology and non-traditional instructional strategies.

Early College High School Grad Succeeds with Double Major at 4-Year School

Gamaliel Narvaez, a 2014 graduate of Lorain County Early College High School is thriving after his success in the program. He was accepted for undergraduate studies at Harvard University but chose The Ohio State University instead. This May he will complete a double major in philosophy and political science.

The 21-year-old from Lorain plans to take a year off to prepare for his LSAT exam with the hopes of attending law school.

After finishing his associate of the arts through Early College High School, Narvaez became heavily involved at The Ohio State University. He completed an internship with Judges John and James Miraldi at the Lorain County Justice Center, made the Dean’s List every semester and plans to graduate with honors. He attributes some of his achievement to his experience with LCCC’s Early College High School.

“Being a part of Early College High School gave me incredible insight into the dynamics of a college environment, and I thank them every time I’m able to tell someone that I graduated high school with an associate degree,” Narvaez said.

“I turned a four-to-five year double major program into a three-year program for me. It saved me a lot of money and prepared me for serious deadlines, dealing with professors and interacting in groups with people of varying ages and social standings,” Narvaez said. He noted that the professors in the program were especially supportive.

The Early College High School is designed for first generation college students who will be the first in their families to graduate from college. Starting in ninth grade students participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and college associate degree at the same time. This year 300 students are participating in the program on the LCCC campus.

All courses are taught tuition free to allow younger students the ability to experience the college’s resources, laboratories, performing arts center, technology and non-traditional instructional strategies.

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