LCCC Breaking Down Financial Barriers for Students

LCCC was represented at an Ohio Department of Higher Education forum by (from left) Cynthia Arredondo, advisor; student Dorisa Johnson; President Marcia Ballinger; and student Anastacia Novosielski.

In 2015, Lorain County Community College was one three community colleges selected by the MDRC, a non-profit, non-partisan education and social policy research organization, to pilot in Ohio a successful New York program focused on helping low-income students achieve greater success.

The Ohio Department of Higher Education recently conducted a panel of experts from the Ohio colleges in the study to review the results of the study. Dr. Marcia Ballinger, president of Lorain County Community College, shared LCCC’s results indicating students in the program are achieving success.

“The early findings that we are seeing is that implementing the right combination of student supports is key to improving academic outcomes for low-income students at LCCC,” said Ballinger said.

The presidents from Cuyahoga Community College and Cincinnati State Community and Technical College also participated in the discussion today along with students from the three colleges including LCCC’s Dorisa Johnson.

To date 344 students in LCCC’s SAIL (Students Accelerating in Learning) program have earned more credit with higher grade point averages while continuing to make progress toward their degrees at a faster rate compared to that of a control group in the study.  Students entered the program each semester since 2015 as either part of study or control groups.

The SAIL program seeks to improve student success by addressing and removing barriers for low-income, first-time, full-time college students who are seeking to earn a degree.  Students who were chosen to participate in the program received personalized advising and career planning advice, free tuition, food gift cards, textbook vouchers and were required to take advantage of tutoring services offered by the college.

SAIL is based on the Accelerating Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) at the City University of New York.

“Anytime we can learn from successful practices of others in higher education, particularly when working with students struggling with all the issues and barriers associated with poverty, count us in,” Ballinger added. “Serving under-resourced students is a critical initiative of the college’s Vision 2020 strategic plan. The real opportunity with this program is to scale it beyond a research study.  We are delighted the Ohio Department of Higher Education is interested in this model.”SAIL logo-tagline

Other highlights from the four student cohort groups that have participated include:

  • 10 SAIL students will have earned an associate degree since beginning the program by the end of fall semester
  • Another 16 are anticipated to graduate in spring of 2017.

SAIL is on target to surpass the 50 percent graduation rate in three years for participants.The Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation provided anchor funding for this study along with grants from other higher education philanthropies.

LCCC Breaking Down Financial Barriers for Students

LCCC was represented at an Ohio Department of Higher Education forum by (from left) Cynthia Arredondo, advisor; student Dorisa Johnson; President Marcia Ballinger; and student Anastacia Novosielski.

In 2015, Lorain County Community College was one three community colleges selected by the MDRC, a non-profit, non-partisan education and social policy research organization, to pilot in Ohio a successful New York program focused on helping low-income students achieve greater success.

The Ohio Department of Higher Education recently conducted a panel of experts from the Ohio colleges in the study to review the results of the study. Dr. Marcia Ballinger, president of Lorain County Community College, shared LCCC’s results indicating students in the program are achieving success.

“The early findings that we are seeing is that implementing the right combination of student supports is key to improving academic outcomes for low-income students at LCCC,” said Ballinger said.

The presidents from Cuyahoga Community College and Cincinnati State Community and Technical College also participated in the discussion today along with students from the three colleges including LCCC’s Dorisa Johnson.

To date 344 students in LCCC’s SAIL (Students Accelerating in Learning) program have earned more credit with higher grade point averages while continuing to make progress toward their degrees at a faster rate compared to that of a control group in the study.  Students entered the program each semester since 2015 as either part of study or control groups.

The SAIL program seeks to improve student success by addressing and removing barriers for low-income, first-time, full-time college students who are seeking to earn a degree.  Students who were chosen to participate in the program received personalized advising and career planning advice, free tuition, food gift cards, textbook vouchers and were required to take advantage of tutoring services offered by the college.

SAIL is based on the Accelerating Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) at the City University of New York.

“Anytime we can learn from successful practices of others in higher education, particularly when working with students struggling with all the issues and barriers associated with poverty, count us in,” Ballinger added. “Serving under-resourced students is a critical initiative of the college’s Vision 2020 strategic plan. The real opportunity with this program is to scale it beyond a research study.  We are delighted the Ohio Department of Higher Education is interested in this model.”SAIL logo-tagline

Other highlights from the four student cohort groups that have participated include:

  • 10 SAIL students will have earned an associate degree since beginning the program by the end of fall semester
  • Another 16 are anticipated to graduate in spring of 2017.

SAIL is on target to surpass the 50 percent graduation rate in three years for participants.The Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation provided anchor funding for this study along with grants from other higher education philanthropies.

LCCC Breaking Down Financial Barriers for Students

LCCC was represented at an Ohio Department of Higher Education forum by (from left) Cynthia Arredondo, advisor; student Dorisa Johnson; President Marcia Ballinger; and student Anastacia Novosielski.

In 2015, Lorain County Community College was one three community colleges selected by the MDRC, a non-profit, non-partisan education and social policy research organization, to pilot in Ohio a successful New York program focused on helping low-income students achieve greater success.

The Ohio Department of Higher Education recently conducted a panel of experts from the Ohio colleges in the study to review the results of the study. Dr. Marcia Ballinger, president of Lorain County Community College, shared LCCC’s results indicating students in the program are achieving success.

“The early findings that we are seeing is that implementing the right combination of student supports is key to improving academic outcomes for low-income students at LCCC,” said Ballinger said.

The presidents from Cuyahoga Community College and Cincinnati State Community and Technical College also participated in the discussion today along with students from the three colleges including LCCC’s Dorisa Johnson.

To date 344 students in LCCC’s SAIL (Students Accelerating in Learning) program have earned more credit with higher grade point averages while continuing to make progress toward their degrees at a faster rate compared to that of a control group in the study.  Students entered the program each semester since 2015 as either part of study or control groups.

The SAIL program seeks to improve student success by addressing and removing barriers for low-income, first-time, full-time college students who are seeking to earn a degree.  Students who were chosen to participate in the program received personalized advising and career planning advice, free tuition, food gift cards, textbook vouchers and were required to take advantage of tutoring services offered by the college.

SAIL is based on the Accelerating Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) at the City University of New York.

“Anytime we can learn from successful practices of others in higher education, particularly when working with students struggling with all the issues and barriers associated with poverty, count us in,” Ballinger added. “Serving under-resourced students is a critical initiative of the college’s Vision 2020 strategic plan. The real opportunity with this program is to scale it beyond a research study.  We are delighted the Ohio Department of Higher Education is interested in this model.”SAIL logo-tagline

Other highlights from the four student cohort groups that have participated include:

  • 10 SAIL students will have earned an associate degree since beginning the program by the end of fall semester
  • Another 16 are anticipated to graduate in spring of 2017.

SAIL is on target to surpass the 50 percent graduation rate in three years for participants.The Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation provided anchor funding for this study along with grants from other higher education philanthropies.

Featured Categories

  • Community

    Lorain County Community College will host a weekly farmers market from 4-7 p.m. every Thursday from June 7 through August 16 outside the Stocker Arts and Spitzer Conference centers. Vendors at the market will primarily be from Northeast Ohio. A variety of locally grown produce, personal products, home décor and more will be exhibited for […]

    Read the full article...
  • Economic Development

    Can someone be born to be an entrepreneur? In Stephen Dury’s case, the answer is a resounding yes. “I’ve been an entrepreneur my entire life, starting with mowing lawns and shoveling snow from driveways when I was 8 years old,” explained Dury. “I’ve always been working for myself in one way or another for as […]

    Read the full article...
  • Education

    Lorain County Community College (LCCC) was named the top community college in the country for Excellence in Student Success by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). Dr. Walter Bumphus, President and CEO of AACC, made the announcement on April 30, 2018 as part of the organization’s Awards of Excellence program at AACC’s national conference. […]

    Read the full article...
  • Culture

    Ali Salgado has already taken the first steps on her path to career discovery at Lorain County Community College — at age 13. When Salgado participated in the Young Women and Young Men in STEAM Camp, one of the “College for Kids and Teens” programs, in 2015, she gained valuable leadership skills and hands-on experiences […]

    Read the full article...