Student Art Addresses Heroin Problem

Ryan Corrigan, left, poses with LCCC incoming president Marcia Ballinger and professor Dennis Ryan.

When is a tissue box not just a tissue box?  When it is an art project in Dennis Ryan’s Graphic Design class.

Students were challenged to create a tissue box representing the current zeitgeist defined as the spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time.

LCCC student, Ryan Corrigan, 20 from Sheffield Village, chose a design based on heroin addiction.  His unique representation exemplifies the cold, dark aspects of addiction.

Tissue box created by Ryan Corrigan.
Tissue box created by Ryan Corrigan.

According to Corrigan, “I know heroin is a terrible problem in Lorain County and I wanted to create awareness of this disease. I just want in some way to help people. It seems like people now are disconnected with each other which leads to isolation and sadness. In this high-tech cell phone, computer world people just don’t interact as in previous times. I created parts of this project in the Fab Lab at Lorain County Community College.”

Ryan commented, “I try to get my students to think outside of the box. I encourage students to research, plan and stretch themselves to come up with unique solutions. Yes, the project is a tissue box but it can be round, square or any other shape and can be fabricated out of any material.  The important part is that all elements work together to create a consistent and powerful message.”

“I am very proud of the staff and students at Lorain County Community College. In 2014, Daniel Cleary, associate professor of English in the division of Arts and Humanities and Dennis Ryan, Computer/Graphic Design instructor teamed up and their students created billboards raising the awareness of the dangers of heroin. These billboards were viewed by thousands all around Lorain County. Now, Ryan Corrigan has found yet another way to creatively drive more attention to the perils of this terrible epidemic,” shared Dr. Marcia Ballinger, incoming president of Lorain County Community College. “The college is completely committed to getting every student the help they need.  This is a community and nationwide problem we need to address together. We really care about the complete well-being of our students.”

If a student has or knows someone with an addiction to heroin or other substance, help is available on campus. The Caring Advocates for Recovery Education (CARE) Center at LCCC is a partnership with the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County. These agencies are collaborating to provide prevention and controlled substance misuse programs as well as support services that will help those dealing with addiction issues or coping with family members who battle addiction. All services are free to the campus community.

According to Elaine Georgas, Executive Director for the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County,  “We are happy to have Lorain County Community College as our partner to provide alcohol and drug addiction treatment services on campus so it is convenient for students.”
CARE Center
Business Building 113D
(440) 366-4848
Hours
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday:
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday:
8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday:
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
A counselor is available by appointment.
Additional Off-Campus Community Resources Include:

The Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County
ADAS
http://www.lorainadas.org
(440) 282-9920

The LACADA Way
http://www.thelcadaway.org
(440) 277-8190

Student Art Addresses Heroin Problem

Ryan Corrigan, left, poses with LCCC incoming president Marcia Ballinger and professor Dennis Ryan.

When is a tissue box not just a tissue box?  When it is an art project in Dennis Ryan’s Graphic Design class.

Students were challenged to create a tissue box representing the current zeitgeist defined as the spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time.

LCCC student, Ryan Corrigan, 20 from Sheffield Village, chose a design based on heroin addiction.  His unique representation exemplifies the cold, dark aspects of addiction.

Tissue box created by Ryan Corrigan.
Tissue box created by Ryan Corrigan.

According to Corrigan, “I know heroin is a terrible problem in Lorain County and I wanted to create awareness of this disease. I just want in some way to help people. It seems like people now are disconnected with each other which leads to isolation and sadness. In this high-tech cell phone, computer world people just don’t interact as in previous times. I created parts of this project in the Fab Lab at Lorain County Community College.”

Ryan commented, “I try to get my students to think outside of the box. I encourage students to research, plan and stretch themselves to come up with unique solutions. Yes, the project is a tissue box but it can be round, square or any other shape and can be fabricated out of any material.  The important part is that all elements work together to create a consistent and powerful message.”

“I am very proud of the staff and students at Lorain County Community College. In 2014, Daniel Cleary, associate professor of English in the division of Arts and Humanities and Dennis Ryan, Computer/Graphic Design instructor teamed up and their students created billboards raising the awareness of the dangers of heroin. These billboards were viewed by thousands all around Lorain County. Now, Ryan Corrigan has found yet another way to creatively drive more attention to the perils of this terrible epidemic,” shared Dr. Marcia Ballinger, incoming president of Lorain County Community College. “The college is completely committed to getting every student the help they need.  This is a community and nationwide problem we need to address together. We really care about the complete well-being of our students.”

If a student has or knows someone with an addiction to heroin or other substance, help is available on campus. The Caring Advocates for Recovery Education (CARE) Center at LCCC is a partnership with the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County. These agencies are collaborating to provide prevention and controlled substance misuse programs as well as support services that will help those dealing with addiction issues or coping with family members who battle addiction. All services are free to the campus community.

According to Elaine Georgas, Executive Director for the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County,  “We are happy to have Lorain County Community College as our partner to provide alcohol and drug addiction treatment services on campus so it is convenient for students.”
CARE Center
Business Building 113D
(440) 366-4848
Hours
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday:
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday:
8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday:
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
A counselor is available by appointment.
Additional Off-Campus Community Resources Include:

The Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County
ADAS
http://www.lorainadas.org
(440) 282-9920

The LACADA Way
http://www.thelcadaway.org
(440) 277-8190

Student Art Addresses Heroin Problem

Ryan Corrigan, left, poses with LCCC incoming president Marcia Ballinger and professor Dennis Ryan.

When is a tissue box not just a tissue box?  When it is an art project in Dennis Ryan’s Graphic Design class.

Students were challenged to create a tissue box representing the current zeitgeist defined as the spirit or mood of a particular period of history as shown by the ideas and beliefs of the time.

LCCC student, Ryan Corrigan, 20 from Sheffield Village, chose a design based on heroin addiction.  His unique representation exemplifies the cold, dark aspects of addiction.

Tissue box created by Ryan Corrigan.
Tissue box created by Ryan Corrigan.

According to Corrigan, “I know heroin is a terrible problem in Lorain County and I wanted to create awareness of this disease. I just want in some way to help people. It seems like people now are disconnected with each other which leads to isolation and sadness. In this high-tech cell phone, computer world people just don’t interact as in previous times. I created parts of this project in the Fab Lab at Lorain County Community College.”

Ryan commented, “I try to get my students to think outside of the box. I encourage students to research, plan and stretch themselves to come up with unique solutions. Yes, the project is a tissue box but it can be round, square or any other shape and can be fabricated out of any material.  The important part is that all elements work together to create a consistent and powerful message.”

“I am very proud of the staff and students at Lorain County Community College. In 2014, Daniel Cleary, associate professor of English in the division of Arts and Humanities and Dennis Ryan, Computer/Graphic Design instructor teamed up and their students created billboards raising the awareness of the dangers of heroin. These billboards were viewed by thousands all around Lorain County. Now, Ryan Corrigan has found yet another way to creatively drive more attention to the perils of this terrible epidemic,” shared Dr. Marcia Ballinger, incoming president of Lorain County Community College. “The college is completely committed to getting every student the help they need.  This is a community and nationwide problem we need to address together. We really care about the complete well-being of our students.”

If a student has or knows someone with an addiction to heroin or other substance, help is available on campus. The Caring Advocates for Recovery Education (CARE) Center at LCCC is a partnership with the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County. These agencies are collaborating to provide prevention and controlled substance misuse programs as well as support services that will help those dealing with addiction issues or coping with family members who battle addiction. All services are free to the campus community.

According to Elaine Georgas, Executive Director for the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County,  “We are happy to have Lorain County Community College as our partner to provide alcohol and drug addiction treatment services on campus so it is convenient for students.”
CARE Center
Business Building 113D
(440) 366-4848
Hours
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday:
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday:
8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday:
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
A counselor is available by appointment.
Additional Off-Campus Community Resources Include:

The Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services Board of Lorain County
ADAS
http://www.lorainadas.org
(440) 282-9920

The LACADA Way
http://www.thelcadaway.org
(440) 277-8190

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