From Assembly Line to the Courtroom

 {mosimage}In 1994, fresh out of high school and looking for direction, Stephanie Smith Pinskey enrolled in Lorain County Community College. "I didn’t take things too seriously then, so I only made it through two semesters," said Pinskey.

She worked her way up to manager in a local McDonalds, followed by a two-year stint in a dental office. In 2000, Pinskey took a part-time assembly line position with Ford. "As a third generation Ford worker, that was always the plan in my family," said Pinskey, who eventually was hired on full time.

In 1994, fresh out of high school and looking for direction, Stephanie Smith Pinskey enrolled in Lorain County Community College. "I didn’t take things too seriously then, so I only made it through two semesters," said Pinskey.

She worked her way up to manager in a local McDonalds, followed by a two-year stint in a dental office. In 2000, Pinskey took a part-time assembly line position with Ford. "As a third generation Ford worker, that was always the plan in my family," said Pinskey, who eventually was hired on full time.

Still seeking direction, Pinskey enrolled in LCCC again in 2001. While juggling a 50-60 hour workweek at Ford, she completed an Associate of Arts degree. It took seven years to complete, but it was just the beginning of her educational journey.

With plant closings and Ford restructuring, Pinskey moved from the Lorain plant to the Avon plant, and even had offers from Ford to relocate to facilities in Missouri and Kansas City. Ford ran in the family blood, so it was natural that her grandmother didn’t understand when Pinskey chose to walk away.

{mosimage}"I didn’t want to live with the uncertainty," Pinskey said. In 2007, she accepted the United Auto Workers (UAW) and Ford’s educational buyout plan, which afforded her $15,000 per year for four years. She entered LCCC’s University Partnership program with Cleveland State University (CSU) and in one year graduated, as a valedictorian nominee, with a bachelor’s degree in Urban Affairs/Management.
 
Night courses at LCCC, coupled with only having to travel to CSU one night per semester, offered Pinskey the opportunity to continue working 30 hours per week at a local law firm.  "Without the amazing opportunity that LCCC provided me, I would not be where I am today," said Pinskey. "I could not have fulfilled my dream of becoming an attorney without LCCC’s UP program. Their program, along with financial assistance from Ford Motor Co and the UAW, changed my life."

In 2008, Pinskey entered Cleveland State’s Marshall College of Law.

"A local prosecutor, who I met while working on my associate’s degree, inspired me to attend law school," said Pinskey, who enrolled in a criminal law course at LCCC on a whim. By 2011, Smith had graduated cum laude and stepped into the world of corporate law at Key Bank. One year later, she opened her own solo criminal law practice in Elyria. 

For Pinskey, it’s been an eleven-year journey from the assembly line to the courtroom, but it’s proven to have been a road worth traveling. "So many working adults need to re-educate themselves, as the manufacturing jobs that were once here in Lorain County are long gone," Pinskey said. "LCCC is an invaluable resource and it’s right here in our own backyard."

Having once faced the possibility of having to relocate out of state, Pinskey sees great value in helping families remain in Lorain County, by providing local employment opportunities obtainable with an advanced education.

"Having been a non-traditional student myself, I’m always advocating for LCCC.  I don’t think enough people know how flexible course scheduling is, particularly with online courses, or how much the instructors want to see their students succeed. The connections they can make and the opportunities that will follow will lead them to success," said Pinskey. 

From Assembly Line to the Courtroom

 {mosimage}In 1994, fresh out of high school and looking for direction, Stephanie Smith Pinskey enrolled in Lorain County Community College. "I didn’t take things too seriously then, so I only made it through two semesters," said Pinskey.

She worked her way up to manager in a local McDonalds, followed by a two-year stint in a dental office. In 2000, Pinskey took a part-time assembly line position with Ford. "As a third generation Ford worker, that was always the plan in my family," said Pinskey, who eventually was hired on full time.

In 1994, fresh out of high school and looking for direction, Stephanie Smith Pinskey enrolled in Lorain County Community College. "I didn’t take things too seriously then, so I only made it through two semesters," said Pinskey.

She worked her way up to manager in a local McDonalds, followed by a two-year stint in a dental office. In 2000, Pinskey took a part-time assembly line position with Ford. "As a third generation Ford worker, that was always the plan in my family," said Pinskey, who eventually was hired on full time.

Still seeking direction, Pinskey enrolled in LCCC again in 2001. While juggling a 50-60 hour workweek at Ford, she completed an Associate of Arts degree. It took seven years to complete, but it was just the beginning of her educational journey.

With plant closings and Ford restructuring, Pinskey moved from the Lorain plant to the Avon plant, and even had offers from Ford to relocate to facilities in Missouri and Kansas City. Ford ran in the family blood, so it was natural that her grandmother didn’t understand when Pinskey chose to walk away.

{mosimage}"I didn’t want to live with the uncertainty," Pinskey said. In 2007, she accepted the United Auto Workers (UAW) and Ford’s educational buyout plan, which afforded her $15,000 per year for four years. She entered LCCC’s University Partnership program with Cleveland State University (CSU) and in one year graduated, as a valedictorian nominee, with a bachelor’s degree in Urban Affairs/Management.
 
Night courses at LCCC, coupled with only having to travel to CSU one night per semester, offered Pinskey the opportunity to continue working 30 hours per week at a local law firm.  "Without the amazing opportunity that LCCC provided me, I would not be where I am today," said Pinskey. "I could not have fulfilled my dream of becoming an attorney without LCCC’s UP program. Their program, along with financial assistance from Ford Motor Co and the UAW, changed my life."

In 2008, Pinskey entered Cleveland State’s Marshall College of Law.

"A local prosecutor, who I met while working on my associate’s degree, inspired me to attend law school," said Pinskey, who enrolled in a criminal law course at LCCC on a whim. By 2011, Smith had graduated cum laude and stepped into the world of corporate law at Key Bank. One year later, she opened her own solo criminal law practice in Elyria. 

For Pinskey, it’s been an eleven-year journey from the assembly line to the courtroom, but it’s proven to have been a road worth traveling. "So many working adults need to re-educate themselves, as the manufacturing jobs that were once here in Lorain County are long gone," Pinskey said. "LCCC is an invaluable resource and it’s right here in our own backyard."

Having once faced the possibility of having to relocate out of state, Pinskey sees great value in helping families remain in Lorain County, by providing local employment opportunities obtainable with an advanced education.

"Having been a non-traditional student myself, I’m always advocating for LCCC.  I don’t think enough people know how flexible course scheduling is, particularly with online courses, or how much the instructors want to see their students succeed. The connections they can make and the opportunities that will follow will lead them to success," said Pinskey. 

From Assembly Line to the Courtroom

 {mosimage}In 1994, fresh out of high school and looking for direction, Stephanie Smith Pinskey enrolled in Lorain County Community College. "I didn’t take things too seriously then, so I only made it through two semesters," said Pinskey.

She worked her way up to manager in a local McDonalds, followed by a two-year stint in a dental office. In 2000, Pinskey took a part-time assembly line position with Ford. "As a third generation Ford worker, that was always the plan in my family," said Pinskey, who eventually was hired on full time.

In 1994, fresh out of high school and looking for direction, Stephanie Smith Pinskey enrolled in Lorain County Community College. "I didn’t take things too seriously then, so I only made it through two semesters," said Pinskey.

She worked her way up to manager in a local McDonalds, followed by a two-year stint in a dental office. In 2000, Pinskey took a part-time assembly line position with Ford. "As a third generation Ford worker, that was always the plan in my family," said Pinskey, who eventually was hired on full time.

Still seeking direction, Pinskey enrolled in LCCC again in 2001. While juggling a 50-60 hour workweek at Ford, she completed an Associate of Arts degree. It took seven years to complete, but it was just the beginning of her educational journey.

With plant closings and Ford restructuring, Pinskey moved from the Lorain plant to the Avon plant, and even had offers from Ford to relocate to facilities in Missouri and Kansas City. Ford ran in the family blood, so it was natural that her grandmother didn’t understand when Pinskey chose to walk away.

{mosimage}"I didn’t want to live with the uncertainty," Pinskey said. In 2007, she accepted the United Auto Workers (UAW) and Ford’s educational buyout plan, which afforded her $15,000 per year for four years. She entered LCCC’s University Partnership program with Cleveland State University (CSU) and in one year graduated, as a valedictorian nominee, with a bachelor’s degree in Urban Affairs/Management.
 
Night courses at LCCC, coupled with only having to travel to CSU one night per semester, offered Pinskey the opportunity to continue working 30 hours per week at a local law firm.  "Without the amazing opportunity that LCCC provided me, I would not be where I am today," said Pinskey. "I could not have fulfilled my dream of becoming an attorney without LCCC’s UP program. Their program, along with financial assistance from Ford Motor Co and the UAW, changed my life."

In 2008, Pinskey entered Cleveland State’s Marshall College of Law.

"A local prosecutor, who I met while working on my associate’s degree, inspired me to attend law school," said Pinskey, who enrolled in a criminal law course at LCCC on a whim. By 2011, Smith had graduated cum laude and stepped into the world of corporate law at Key Bank. One year later, she opened her own solo criminal law practice in Elyria. 

For Pinskey, it’s been an eleven-year journey from the assembly line to the courtroom, but it’s proven to have been a road worth traveling. "So many working adults need to re-educate themselves, as the manufacturing jobs that were once here in Lorain County are long gone," Pinskey said. "LCCC is an invaluable resource and it’s right here in our own backyard."

Having once faced the possibility of having to relocate out of state, Pinskey sees great value in helping families remain in Lorain County, by providing local employment opportunities obtainable with an advanced education.

"Having been a non-traditional student myself, I’m always advocating for LCCC.  I don’t think enough people know how flexible course scheduling is, particularly with online courses, or how much the instructors want to see their students succeed. The connections they can make and the opportunities that will follow will lead them to success," said Pinskey. 

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