Community Members Rally for LCCC

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership have a direct impact on raising Lorain County’s educational attainment, preparing residents with the right skills needed for good jobs and helping companies stay competitive with access to a talented workforce.

That’s the message a group of community members from business, health care, organized labor, education, local government, community organizations and LCCC students reiterated over and over again during a rally held by the Citizens for LCCC on Issue 2, which will be on the November 5 ballot.

"It is well documented that education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation," said Victor Leandry, Executive Director of El Centro. "Lorain County Community College has been a great partner in the effort to encourage more minorities, many first generation college students, to pursue higher education."

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

Watch a video of the campus rally.

Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership have a direct impact on raising Lorain County’s educational attainment, preparing residents with the right skills needed for good jobs and helping companies stay competitive with access to a talented workforce.

That’s the message a group of community members from business, health care, organized labor, education, local government, community organizations and LCCC students reiterated over and over again during a rally held by the Citizens for LCCC on Issue 2, which will be on the November 5 ballot.

{mosimage}"It is well documented that education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation," said Victor Leandry, Executive Director of El Centro. "Lorain County Community College has been a great partner in the effort to encourage more minorities, many first generation college students, to pursue higher education."

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

"Without a strong LCCC and the University Partnership, clients of El Centro wouldn’t have the opportunity to even consider higher education," Leandry said.

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

"Without a strong LCCC and the University Partnership, clients of El Centro wouldn’t have the opportunity to even consider higher education," Leandry said.

Meletha Glover, a 20-year Navy veteran, LCCC graduate and current University Partnership student said LCCC plays an important role in helping returning veterans prepare for life after the military.

"LCCC is very user friendly for veterans," she said. "The faculty, staff and students really try to reach out and embrace them."

She is participating in the development of a student club for veterans along with the LCCC Veterans Services Team and other faculty and staff.

"Issue 2 is important for our community. It’s especially important to those who served this country and will serve in the future," Glover said.

According to research more than 60 percent of all jobs in Ohio by 2020 will require some postsecondary education. 

"Access to affordable, quality higher education is more important than ever to ensuring people are prepared for jobs and for keeping Lorain County’s economy growing," said Dr. Roy A. Church, President of Lorain County Community College.  "Local levy support is important to keep LCCC and its University Partnership delivering real value and results that lead to a better future for our community." 

When businesses across the county, like EMH Healthcare, hire LCCC graduates they know they are getting quality employees.

"The college’s programs – across the board from allied health and nursing to business and information technology – are top-rated," said Char Wray, Vice President of Clinical Operations at EMH Healthcare.

It’s important to keep LCCC’s University Partnership strong so that there is a local resource to help increase educational attainment in the county, she noted.

"Issue 2 keeps the quality of programs high and graduates learning what we, as employers, need the most," Wray said.

Mike Sherman, Regional Representative for the Ohio State Association of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, and a member of LCCC’s District Board of Trustees, said for 50 years LCCC has been here for the community and it’s time for the community to return that support.

"Whenever there has been a need, good or bad, LCCC has been here ready to lend a hand and work with organized labor to keep our workforce strong," Sherman said.

Because there have been significant changes in all industries that are placing more importance on the skills and knowledge of workers at all levels it’s critical, he added, that Lorain County residents have a strong community college.

"Lorain County workers depend upon Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership to keep them up to date," Sherman said.

LCCC and the University Partnership also provide a tremendous value to students who hope to get a head start on college while still in high school. LCCC has a variety of dual enrollment programs that allow high school students to take college courses and earn both high school and college credit.

"In fact, last year alone more than 2,000 students earned 15,000 credit hours saving their families nearly $2 million in college tuition, fees and books and eliminating or significantly reducing college debt," Church said.

Robert Scott, Superintendent of Avon Lake Schools, said LCCC is a tremendous support to the school districts in Lorain County. About 180 Avon Lake High School students are earning college credit this year, he noted.

"We’ve worked hard to blur the lines between high school and college making the transition as seamless and natural as possible," Scott said. "This blurring of the lines and high expectations we establish sets our students up for continued success academically and as they transition into careers."

And, he added, "Parents love this and understand the tremendous value earning 30-50, even 100 college credits saves their family."

LCCC graduates make up a significant fabric of our community, said Lorain County Commissioner, Ted Kalo.

"LCCC’s imprint is across our entire county in its alumni base," Kalo said. "These graduates live and work here, raise their families here and become involved citizens."

Sheffield Village Mayor John Hunter echoed Kalo’s comments, noting that in the last five years alone almost 1,000 Sheffield Village residents took courses from LCCC.

"It’s everyone’s college and plays a major role in facilitating community collaborations and partnerships," Hunter said. "It’s now our turn to continue the support for LCCC and start it on its next 50 years."

Community Members Rally for LCCC

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership have a direct impact on raising Lorain County’s educational attainment, preparing residents with the right skills needed for good jobs and helping companies stay competitive with access to a talented workforce.

That’s the message a group of community members from business, health care, organized labor, education, local government, community organizations and LCCC students reiterated over and over again during a rally held by the Citizens for LCCC on Issue 2, which will be on the November 5 ballot.

"It is well documented that education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation," said Victor Leandry, Executive Director of El Centro. "Lorain County Community College has been a great partner in the effort to encourage more minorities, many first generation college students, to pursue higher education."

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

Watch a video of the campus rally.

Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership have a direct impact on raising Lorain County’s educational attainment, preparing residents with the right skills needed for good jobs and helping companies stay competitive with access to a talented workforce.

That’s the message a group of community members from business, health care, organized labor, education, local government, community organizations and LCCC students reiterated over and over again during a rally held by the Citizens for LCCC on Issue 2, which will be on the November 5 ballot.

{mosimage}"It is well documented that education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation," said Victor Leandry, Executive Director of El Centro. "Lorain County Community College has been a great partner in the effort to encourage more minorities, many first generation college students, to pursue higher education."

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

"Without a strong LCCC and the University Partnership, clients of El Centro wouldn’t have the opportunity to even consider higher education," Leandry said.

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

"Without a strong LCCC and the University Partnership, clients of El Centro wouldn’t have the opportunity to even consider higher education," Leandry said.

Meletha Glover, a 20-year Navy veteran, LCCC graduate and current University Partnership student said LCCC plays an important role in helping returning veterans prepare for life after the military.

"LCCC is very user friendly for veterans," she said. "The faculty, staff and students really try to reach out and embrace them."

She is participating in the development of a student club for veterans along with the LCCC Veterans Services Team and other faculty and staff.

"Issue 2 is important for our community. It’s especially important to those who served this country and will serve in the future," Glover said.

According to research more than 60 percent of all jobs in Ohio by 2020 will require some postsecondary education. 

"Access to affordable, quality higher education is more important than ever to ensuring people are prepared for jobs and for keeping Lorain County’s economy growing," said Dr. Roy A. Church, President of Lorain County Community College.  "Local levy support is important to keep LCCC and its University Partnership delivering real value and results that lead to a better future for our community." 

When businesses across the county, like EMH Healthcare, hire LCCC graduates they know they are getting quality employees.

"The college’s programs – across the board from allied health and nursing to business and information technology – are top-rated," said Char Wray, Vice President of Clinical Operations at EMH Healthcare.

It’s important to keep LCCC’s University Partnership strong so that there is a local resource to help increase educational attainment in the county, she noted.

"Issue 2 keeps the quality of programs high and graduates learning what we, as employers, need the most," Wray said.

Mike Sherman, Regional Representative for the Ohio State Association of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, and a member of LCCC’s District Board of Trustees, said for 50 years LCCC has been here for the community and it’s time for the community to return that support.

"Whenever there has been a need, good or bad, LCCC has been here ready to lend a hand and work with organized labor to keep our workforce strong," Sherman said.

Because there have been significant changes in all industries that are placing more importance on the skills and knowledge of workers at all levels it’s critical, he added, that Lorain County residents have a strong community college.

"Lorain County workers depend upon Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership to keep them up to date," Sherman said.

LCCC and the University Partnership also provide a tremendous value to students who hope to get a head start on college while still in high school. LCCC has a variety of dual enrollment programs that allow high school students to take college courses and earn both high school and college credit.

"In fact, last year alone more than 2,000 students earned 15,000 credit hours saving their families nearly $2 million in college tuition, fees and books and eliminating or significantly reducing college debt," Church said.

Robert Scott, Superintendent of Avon Lake Schools, said LCCC is a tremendous support to the school districts in Lorain County. About 180 Avon Lake High School students are earning college credit this year, he noted.

"We’ve worked hard to blur the lines between high school and college making the transition as seamless and natural as possible," Scott said. "This blurring of the lines and high expectations we establish sets our students up for continued success academically and as they transition into careers."

And, he added, "Parents love this and understand the tremendous value earning 30-50, even 100 college credits saves their family."

LCCC graduates make up a significant fabric of our community, said Lorain County Commissioner, Ted Kalo.

"LCCC’s imprint is across our entire county in its alumni base," Kalo said. "These graduates live and work here, raise their families here and become involved citizens."

Sheffield Village Mayor John Hunter echoed Kalo’s comments, noting that in the last five years alone almost 1,000 Sheffield Village residents took courses from LCCC.

"It’s everyone’s college and plays a major role in facilitating community collaborations and partnerships," Hunter said. "It’s now our turn to continue the support for LCCC and start it on its next 50 years."

Community Members Rally for LCCC

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership have a direct impact on raising Lorain County’s educational attainment, preparing residents with the right skills needed for good jobs and helping companies stay competitive with access to a talented workforce.

That’s the message a group of community members from business, health care, organized labor, education, local government, community organizations and LCCC students reiterated over and over again during a rally held by the Citizens for LCCC on Issue 2, which will be on the November 5 ballot.

"It is well documented that education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation," said Victor Leandry, Executive Director of El Centro. "Lorain County Community College has been a great partner in the effort to encourage more minorities, many first generation college students, to pursue higher education."

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

Watch a video of the campus rally.

Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership have a direct impact on raising Lorain County’s educational attainment, preparing residents with the right skills needed for good jobs and helping companies stay competitive with access to a talented workforce.

That’s the message a group of community members from business, health care, organized labor, education, local government, community organizations and LCCC students reiterated over and over again during a rally held by the Citizens for LCCC on Issue 2, which will be on the November 5 ballot.

{mosimage}"It is well documented that education is the single most important instrument for social and economic transformation," said Victor Leandry, Executive Director of El Centro. "Lorain County Community College has been a great partner in the effort to encourage more minorities, many first generation college students, to pursue higher education."

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

"Without a strong LCCC and the University Partnership, clients of El Centro wouldn’t have the opportunity to even consider higher education," Leandry said.

Leandry added that many of El Centro’s clients are place bound with limited financial means and transportation.

"Without a strong LCCC and the University Partnership, clients of El Centro wouldn’t have the opportunity to even consider higher education," Leandry said.

Meletha Glover, a 20-year Navy veteran, LCCC graduate and current University Partnership student said LCCC plays an important role in helping returning veterans prepare for life after the military.

"LCCC is very user friendly for veterans," she said. "The faculty, staff and students really try to reach out and embrace them."

She is participating in the development of a student club for veterans along with the LCCC Veterans Services Team and other faculty and staff.

"Issue 2 is important for our community. It’s especially important to those who served this country and will serve in the future," Glover said.

According to research more than 60 percent of all jobs in Ohio by 2020 will require some postsecondary education. 

"Access to affordable, quality higher education is more important than ever to ensuring people are prepared for jobs and for keeping Lorain County’s economy growing," said Dr. Roy A. Church, President of Lorain County Community College.  "Local levy support is important to keep LCCC and its University Partnership delivering real value and results that lead to a better future for our community." 

When businesses across the county, like EMH Healthcare, hire LCCC graduates they know they are getting quality employees.

"The college’s programs – across the board from allied health and nursing to business and information technology – are top-rated," said Char Wray, Vice President of Clinical Operations at EMH Healthcare.

It’s important to keep LCCC’s University Partnership strong so that there is a local resource to help increase educational attainment in the county, she noted.

"Issue 2 keeps the quality of programs high and graduates learning what we, as employers, need the most," Wray said.

Mike Sherman, Regional Representative for the Ohio State Association of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, and a member of LCCC’s District Board of Trustees, said for 50 years LCCC has been here for the community and it’s time for the community to return that support.

"Whenever there has been a need, good or bad, LCCC has been here ready to lend a hand and work with organized labor to keep our workforce strong," Sherman said.

Because there have been significant changes in all industries that are placing more importance on the skills and knowledge of workers at all levels it’s critical, he added, that Lorain County residents have a strong community college.

"Lorain County workers depend upon Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership to keep them up to date," Sherman said.

LCCC and the University Partnership also provide a tremendous value to students who hope to get a head start on college while still in high school. LCCC has a variety of dual enrollment programs that allow high school students to take college courses and earn both high school and college credit.

"In fact, last year alone more than 2,000 students earned 15,000 credit hours saving their families nearly $2 million in college tuition, fees and books and eliminating or significantly reducing college debt," Church said.

Robert Scott, Superintendent of Avon Lake Schools, said LCCC is a tremendous support to the school districts in Lorain County. About 180 Avon Lake High School students are earning college credit this year, he noted.

"We’ve worked hard to blur the lines between high school and college making the transition as seamless and natural as possible," Scott said. "This blurring of the lines and high expectations we establish sets our students up for continued success academically and as they transition into careers."

And, he added, "Parents love this and understand the tremendous value earning 30-50, even 100 college credits saves their family."

LCCC graduates make up a significant fabric of our community, said Lorain County Commissioner, Ted Kalo.

"LCCC’s imprint is across our entire county in its alumni base," Kalo said. "These graduates live and work here, raise their families here and become involved citizens."

Sheffield Village Mayor John Hunter echoed Kalo’s comments, noting that in the last five years alone almost 1,000 Sheffield Village residents took courses from LCCC.

"It’s everyone’s college and plays a major role in facilitating community collaborations and partnerships," Hunter said. "It’s now our turn to continue the support for LCCC and start it on its next 50 years."

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