Elyria Resident Finds Value in Life Long Learning; Earns Degree from University Partnership

{mosimage}Elyria resident John Sabo, 44, values life long learning and is continually improving his knowledge to improve his chances for advancement. 

Sabo, who earned his Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering through the University of Toledo and Lorain County Community College’s University Partnership program in May is no stranger to balancing work and studies.

He first enrolled at LCCC just after high school, earning an associate degree while apprenticing with the Ridge Tool Company. With a Journeyman’s card as an electrician, he knew even back then that his degree from LCCC was paying off. In 1994, Sabo landed a position as an electrician with the Ford Motor Co.

Moving through the ranks, Sabo eventually became a trainer/instructor at Ford, teaching employees about programmable logic controllers, a computerized system that replaces old mechanical relay switches. In 2008, when buy outs were being handed out at many automotive plants, Sabo decided to ensure his future with the company, by pursuing a second degree through LCCC.

{mosimage}Elyria resident John Sabo, 44, values life long learning and is continually improving his knowledge to improve his chances for advancement. 

Sabo, who earned his Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering through the University of Toledo and Lorain County Community College’s University Partnership program in May is no stranger to balancing work and studies.

He first enrolled at LCCC just after high school, earning an associate degree while apprenticing with the Ridge Tool Company. With a Journeyman’s card as an electrician, he knew even back then that his degree from LCCC was paying off. In 1994, Sabo landed a position as an electrician with the Ford Motor Co.

Moving through the ranks, Sabo eventually became a trainer/instructor at Ford, teaching employees about programmable logic controllers, a computerized system that replaces old mechanical relay switches. In 2008, when buy outs were being handed out at many automotive plants, Sabo decided to ensure his future with the company, by pursuing a second degree through LCCC.

"Education is the key," Sabo said.  "I’ve never stopped learning." And with Ford’s educational program that covered $5,000 of college costs per year, he took advantage of the opportunity to expand his knowledge at LCCC.

As the electrical trade, like most, has expanded into the computer age over the past two decades, Sabo realized an advanced degree was once again the key. "I was looking for a program that aligned with what I do at work," said Sabo. 

Working with the hardware and software of control systems, he found the labs at LCCC to be state of the art. "It’s a really good program. It didn’t hurt that I live just a few blocks from campus either."

In the future, Sabo would like to be a controls engineer or software designer, and help design new products for Ford. But that would involve a move to California or Michigan, so for now, he’ll remain at the Brookpark EcoBoost Plant. 
 
"The University Partnership program at LCCC has given me the skills and preparation needed to be a more productive employee," said Sabo. While LCCC provided Sabo with the opportunity to advance, he said individual desire is important.  "I have the drive inside myself to be the best I can be," he said.   

For more information on any programs through the University Partnership, call 440-366-4949 or visit www.lorainccc.edu/up.

Elyria Resident Finds Value in Life Long Learning; Earns Degree from University Partnership

{mosimage}Elyria resident John Sabo, 44, values life long learning and is continually improving his knowledge to improve his chances for advancement. 

Sabo, who earned his Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering through the University of Toledo and Lorain County Community College’s University Partnership program in May is no stranger to balancing work and studies.

He first enrolled at LCCC just after high school, earning an associate degree while apprenticing with the Ridge Tool Company. With a Journeyman’s card as an electrician, he knew even back then that his degree from LCCC was paying off. In 1994, Sabo landed a position as an electrician with the Ford Motor Co.

Moving through the ranks, Sabo eventually became a trainer/instructor at Ford, teaching employees about programmable logic controllers, a computerized system that replaces old mechanical relay switches. In 2008, when buy outs were being handed out at many automotive plants, Sabo decided to ensure his future with the company, by pursuing a second degree through LCCC.

{mosimage}Elyria resident John Sabo, 44, values life long learning and is continually improving his knowledge to improve his chances for advancement. 

Sabo, who earned his Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering through the University of Toledo and Lorain County Community College’s University Partnership program in May is no stranger to balancing work and studies.

He first enrolled at LCCC just after high school, earning an associate degree while apprenticing with the Ridge Tool Company. With a Journeyman’s card as an electrician, he knew even back then that his degree from LCCC was paying off. In 1994, Sabo landed a position as an electrician with the Ford Motor Co.

Moving through the ranks, Sabo eventually became a trainer/instructor at Ford, teaching employees about programmable logic controllers, a computerized system that replaces old mechanical relay switches. In 2008, when buy outs were being handed out at many automotive plants, Sabo decided to ensure his future with the company, by pursuing a second degree through LCCC.

"Education is the key," Sabo said.  "I’ve never stopped learning." And with Ford’s educational program that covered $5,000 of college costs per year, he took advantage of the opportunity to expand his knowledge at LCCC.

As the electrical trade, like most, has expanded into the computer age over the past two decades, Sabo realized an advanced degree was once again the key. "I was looking for a program that aligned with what I do at work," said Sabo. 

Working with the hardware and software of control systems, he found the labs at LCCC to be state of the art. "It’s a really good program. It didn’t hurt that I live just a few blocks from campus either."

In the future, Sabo would like to be a controls engineer or software designer, and help design new products for Ford. But that would involve a move to California or Michigan, so for now, he’ll remain at the Brookpark EcoBoost Plant. 
 
"The University Partnership program at LCCC has given me the skills and preparation needed to be a more productive employee," said Sabo. While LCCC provided Sabo with the opportunity to advance, he said individual desire is important.  "I have the drive inside myself to be the best I can be," he said.   

For more information on any programs through the University Partnership, call 440-366-4949 or visit www.lorainccc.edu/up.

Elyria Resident Finds Value in Life Long Learning; Earns Degree from University Partnership

{mosimage}Elyria resident John Sabo, 44, values life long learning and is continually improving his knowledge to improve his chances for advancement. 

Sabo, who earned his Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering through the University of Toledo and Lorain County Community College’s University Partnership program in May is no stranger to balancing work and studies.

He first enrolled at LCCC just after high school, earning an associate degree while apprenticing with the Ridge Tool Company. With a Journeyman’s card as an electrician, he knew even back then that his degree from LCCC was paying off. In 1994, Sabo landed a position as an electrician with the Ford Motor Co.

Moving through the ranks, Sabo eventually became a trainer/instructor at Ford, teaching employees about programmable logic controllers, a computerized system that replaces old mechanical relay switches. In 2008, when buy outs were being handed out at many automotive plants, Sabo decided to ensure his future with the company, by pursuing a second degree through LCCC.

{mosimage}Elyria resident John Sabo, 44, values life long learning and is continually improving his knowledge to improve his chances for advancement. 

Sabo, who earned his Bachelor of Science in computer science and engineering through the University of Toledo and Lorain County Community College’s University Partnership program in May is no stranger to balancing work and studies.

He first enrolled at LCCC just after high school, earning an associate degree while apprenticing with the Ridge Tool Company. With a Journeyman’s card as an electrician, he knew even back then that his degree from LCCC was paying off. In 1994, Sabo landed a position as an electrician with the Ford Motor Co.

Moving through the ranks, Sabo eventually became a trainer/instructor at Ford, teaching employees about programmable logic controllers, a computerized system that replaces old mechanical relay switches. In 2008, when buy outs were being handed out at many automotive plants, Sabo decided to ensure his future with the company, by pursuing a second degree through LCCC.

"Education is the key," Sabo said.  "I’ve never stopped learning." And with Ford’s educational program that covered $5,000 of college costs per year, he took advantage of the opportunity to expand his knowledge at LCCC.

As the electrical trade, like most, has expanded into the computer age over the past two decades, Sabo realized an advanced degree was once again the key. "I was looking for a program that aligned with what I do at work," said Sabo. 

Working with the hardware and software of control systems, he found the labs at LCCC to be state of the art. "It’s a really good program. It didn’t hurt that I live just a few blocks from campus either."

In the future, Sabo would like to be a controls engineer or software designer, and help design new products for Ford. But that would involve a move to California or Michigan, so for now, he’ll remain at the Brookpark EcoBoost Plant. 
 
"The University Partnership program at LCCC has given me the skills and preparation needed to be a more productive employee," said Sabo. While LCCC provided Sabo with the opportunity to advance, he said individual desire is important.  "I have the drive inside myself to be the best I can be," he said.   

For more information on any programs through the University Partnership, call 440-366-4949 or visit www.lorainccc.edu/up.

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