Getting a Foot in the Door: UP Degrees and a Co-op Help Make Career Connections

{mosimage}Many UP students embrace the opportunity to make important job connections while they’re still in school. Austyn Pember, 24, and Taylor Pember, 21, created a path to higher learning that extends beyond the classroom.

"As part the University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program through LCCC’s University Partnership, co-ops are mandatory and I like it because it gets you through the door," said Austyn Pember.

 

Many UP students embrace the opportunity to make important job connections while they’re still in school. Austyn Pember, 24, and Taylor Pember, 21, created a path to higher learning that extends beyond the classroom.

"As part the University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program through LCCC’s University Partnership, co-ops are mandatory and I like it because it gets you through the door," said Austyn Pember.

{mosimage}Austyn, who started his academic career at The University of Toledo, decided to transfer to LCCC. "I discovered campus life wasn’t really for me. Plus, I saved my parents a ton of money by receiving my associate of arts and science from LCCC," he said. Both siblings are recipients of the Computer Science and Engineering Scholarship from the LCCC Foundation.

In May 2012, Austyn earned an associate of arts and an associate of science. In December 2013, Austyn will receive a bachelor of science in computer science and engineering from The University of Toledo. Taylor, while still in high school, decided to join her brother on a visit to the program manager with The University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program.

"I like math and I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to major in, so I thought tagging along wouldn’t hurt," Taylor Pember said. Taylor ended up earning her associate of science in May 2012 and is slated to receive her bachelor of science in computer science and engineering from The University of Toledo in May 2014.

Cooperative Education – Co-op, for short – is an arrangement between educators and employers that allows students to work in a field of interest while earning money and academic credit. As residents of Amherst, the brother and sister took a bus to Toledo to attend a University of Toledo career fair. 

"We both interviewed for three places before getting our co-op," said Taylor.

Austyn connected with Hansen, Inc. a full-service digital agency located in Maumee, Ohio. He’s managed to stay for three years and build relationships. Taylor has completed three co-ops – two at RW Beckett during the summer of 2011 and spring 2012 and one at NASA Glenn in summer 2012. Taylor returned to NASA for this summer.

Co-op provides valuable on-the-job training, allowing students to take what they’ve learned in the classroom and apply it to real workplace situations and challenges. In so doing they fine-tune technical skills and know-how, and they also learn important "soft" skills – communication, team building, problem solving.  Plus, a co-op experience allows students to earn money to help offset college expenses. 

"At Hansen, I assist in website development and quality assurance," said Austyn.

One year, Austyn got the chance to use coursework to design and program his own game. It had a learning component – "I learned how to do auto-programming fundamentals. I also helped design and work through some of their web site process," he said.

"At Beckett, I got the chance to gain hardware experience through prototype circuit board assembly, analysis, and troubleshooting," noted Taylor. "Last summer at NASA, I programmed touch-screen displays that go to vacuum chambers."

The Pember siblings’ situation is not unique: The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) reports that students who took part in a paid co-op were more likely to get a job offer, have a job in hand by the time they graduated, and receive a higher starting salary offer than their peers who did not (NACE 2011 Student Survey). In fact, more than 40 percent of students with co-op experience got at least one offers after applying for a job, while only 30 percent without that experience got an offer.

Co-op offers another extremely important benefit as well: It’s often the link to future employment and a rewarding career.

"The CSE program is very broad which is great because your co-op experience can be tailored to your specific interests," said Taylor.

Many employers realize it’s a great opportunity to develop future talent, contribute to the success of students in their community, and in many cases, see first-hand how a potential employee would perform on the job.

"I know more than five people who graduated in spring who have jobs lined up. I’m more confident that this opportunity could happen for me next year when I graduate," notes Taylor.

Not all co-op students will have jobs waiting for them when they graduate, but the experience will go a long way in today’s job market, where candidates need every edge they can get. Experience in the workplace – where students’ skills are really put to the test – is an invaluable credential.

For more information on a degree program through the University Partnership, call 440-366-4949 or visit www.lorainccc.edu/up.

Getting a Foot in the Door: UP Degrees and a Co-op Help Make Career Connections

{mosimage}Many UP students embrace the opportunity to make important job connections while they’re still in school. Austyn Pember, 24, and Taylor Pember, 21, created a path to higher learning that extends beyond the classroom.

"As part the University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program through LCCC’s University Partnership, co-ops are mandatory and I like it because it gets you through the door," said Austyn Pember.

 

Many UP students embrace the opportunity to make important job connections while they’re still in school. Austyn Pember, 24, and Taylor Pember, 21, created a path to higher learning that extends beyond the classroom.

"As part the University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program through LCCC’s University Partnership, co-ops are mandatory and I like it because it gets you through the door," said Austyn Pember.

{mosimage}Austyn, who started his academic career at The University of Toledo, decided to transfer to LCCC. "I discovered campus life wasn’t really for me. Plus, I saved my parents a ton of money by receiving my associate of arts and science from LCCC," he said. Both siblings are recipients of the Computer Science and Engineering Scholarship from the LCCC Foundation.

In May 2012, Austyn earned an associate of arts and an associate of science. In December 2013, Austyn will receive a bachelor of science in computer science and engineering from The University of Toledo. Taylor, while still in high school, decided to join her brother on a visit to the program manager with The University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program.

"I like math and I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to major in, so I thought tagging along wouldn’t hurt," Taylor Pember said. Taylor ended up earning her associate of science in May 2012 and is slated to receive her bachelor of science in computer science and engineering from The University of Toledo in May 2014.

Cooperative Education – Co-op, for short – is an arrangement between educators and employers that allows students to work in a field of interest while earning money and academic credit. As residents of Amherst, the brother and sister took a bus to Toledo to attend a University of Toledo career fair. 

"We both interviewed for three places before getting our co-op," said Taylor.

Austyn connected with Hansen, Inc. a full-service digital agency located in Maumee, Ohio. He’s managed to stay for three years and build relationships. Taylor has completed three co-ops – two at RW Beckett during the summer of 2011 and spring 2012 and one at NASA Glenn in summer 2012. Taylor returned to NASA for this summer.

Co-op provides valuable on-the-job training, allowing students to take what they’ve learned in the classroom and apply it to real workplace situations and challenges. In so doing they fine-tune technical skills and know-how, and they also learn important "soft" skills – communication, team building, problem solving.  Plus, a co-op experience allows students to earn money to help offset college expenses. 

"At Hansen, I assist in website development and quality assurance," said Austyn.

One year, Austyn got the chance to use coursework to design and program his own game. It had a learning component – "I learned how to do auto-programming fundamentals. I also helped design and work through some of their web site process," he said.

"At Beckett, I got the chance to gain hardware experience through prototype circuit board assembly, analysis, and troubleshooting," noted Taylor. "Last summer at NASA, I programmed touch-screen displays that go to vacuum chambers."

The Pember siblings’ situation is not unique: The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) reports that students who took part in a paid co-op were more likely to get a job offer, have a job in hand by the time they graduated, and receive a higher starting salary offer than their peers who did not (NACE 2011 Student Survey). In fact, more than 40 percent of students with co-op experience got at least one offers after applying for a job, while only 30 percent without that experience got an offer.

Co-op offers another extremely important benefit as well: It’s often the link to future employment and a rewarding career.

"The CSE program is very broad which is great because your co-op experience can be tailored to your specific interests," said Taylor.

Many employers realize it’s a great opportunity to develop future talent, contribute to the success of students in their community, and in many cases, see first-hand how a potential employee would perform on the job.

"I know more than five people who graduated in spring who have jobs lined up. I’m more confident that this opportunity could happen for me next year when I graduate," notes Taylor.

Not all co-op students will have jobs waiting for them when they graduate, but the experience will go a long way in today’s job market, where candidates need every edge they can get. Experience in the workplace – where students’ skills are really put to the test – is an invaluable credential.

For more information on a degree program through the University Partnership, call 440-366-4949 or visit www.lorainccc.edu/up.

Getting a Foot in the Door: UP Degrees and a Co-op Help Make Career Connections

{mosimage}Many UP students embrace the opportunity to make important job connections while they’re still in school. Austyn Pember, 24, and Taylor Pember, 21, created a path to higher learning that extends beyond the classroom.

"As part the University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program through LCCC’s University Partnership, co-ops are mandatory and I like it because it gets you through the door," said Austyn Pember.

 

Many UP students embrace the opportunity to make important job connections while they’re still in school. Austyn Pember, 24, and Taylor Pember, 21, created a path to higher learning that extends beyond the classroom.

"As part the University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program through LCCC’s University Partnership, co-ops are mandatory and I like it because it gets you through the door," said Austyn Pember.

{mosimage}Austyn, who started his academic career at The University of Toledo, decided to transfer to LCCC. "I discovered campus life wasn’t really for me. Plus, I saved my parents a ton of money by receiving my associate of arts and science from LCCC," he said. Both siblings are recipients of the Computer Science and Engineering Scholarship from the LCCC Foundation.

In May 2012, Austyn earned an associate of arts and an associate of science. In December 2013, Austyn will receive a bachelor of science in computer science and engineering from The University of Toledo. Taylor, while still in high school, decided to join her brother on a visit to the program manager with The University of Toledo’s computer science and engineering program.

"I like math and I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to major in, so I thought tagging along wouldn’t hurt," Taylor Pember said. Taylor ended up earning her associate of science in May 2012 and is slated to receive her bachelor of science in computer science and engineering from The University of Toledo in May 2014.

Cooperative Education – Co-op, for short – is an arrangement between educators and employers that allows students to work in a field of interest while earning money and academic credit. As residents of Amherst, the brother and sister took a bus to Toledo to attend a University of Toledo career fair. 

"We both interviewed for three places before getting our co-op," said Taylor.

Austyn connected with Hansen, Inc. a full-service digital agency located in Maumee, Ohio. He’s managed to stay for three years and build relationships. Taylor has completed three co-ops – two at RW Beckett during the summer of 2011 and spring 2012 and one at NASA Glenn in summer 2012. Taylor returned to NASA for this summer.

Co-op provides valuable on-the-job training, allowing students to take what they’ve learned in the classroom and apply it to real workplace situations and challenges. In so doing they fine-tune technical skills and know-how, and they also learn important "soft" skills – communication, team building, problem solving.  Plus, a co-op experience allows students to earn money to help offset college expenses. 

"At Hansen, I assist in website development and quality assurance," said Austyn.

One year, Austyn got the chance to use coursework to design and program his own game. It had a learning component – "I learned how to do auto-programming fundamentals. I also helped design and work through some of their web site process," he said.

"At Beckett, I got the chance to gain hardware experience through prototype circuit board assembly, analysis, and troubleshooting," noted Taylor. "Last summer at NASA, I programmed touch-screen displays that go to vacuum chambers."

The Pember siblings’ situation is not unique: The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) reports that students who took part in a paid co-op were more likely to get a job offer, have a job in hand by the time they graduated, and receive a higher starting salary offer than their peers who did not (NACE 2011 Student Survey). In fact, more than 40 percent of students with co-op experience got at least one offers after applying for a job, while only 30 percent without that experience got an offer.

Co-op offers another extremely important benefit as well: It’s often the link to future employment and a rewarding career.

"The CSE program is very broad which is great because your co-op experience can be tailored to your specific interests," said Taylor.

Many employers realize it’s a great opportunity to develop future talent, contribute to the success of students in their community, and in many cases, see first-hand how a potential employee would perform on the job.

"I know more than five people who graduated in spring who have jobs lined up. I’m more confident that this opportunity could happen for me next year when I graduate," notes Taylor.

Not all co-op students will have jobs waiting for them when they graduate, but the experience will go a long way in today’s job market, where candidates need every edge they can get. Experience in the workplace – where students’ skills are really put to the test – is an invaluable credential.

For more information on a degree program through the University Partnership, call 440-366-4949 or visit www.lorainccc.edu/up.

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