2012 Graduates Encouraged to Embrace Innovative Thinking And Help Others Reach Their Potential

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership graduates received two messages at this year’s commencement ceremony.

The first from LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church was to honor their innovative spirit and not let negative thinkers detract them from their goals.

The 570 graduates who participated in the ceremony were then challenged to pay forward the help they received to achieve their goal by keynote speaker Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of Innovation and Enterprise Development for the Ohio Board of Regents.

Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership graduates received two messages at this year’s commencement ceremony.

{mosimage}The first from LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church was to honor their innovative spirit and not let negative thinkers detract them from their goals.

"Throughout history, that is what innovators have done. They’ve looked into the face of doubt, regardless of the source, and chose to ignore it. And in doing so, they’ve achieved incredible things," Church said. "Just think what wouldn’t be today if people didn’t push themselves to reach the highest degree of innovation they could; if they didn’t invent new things."

He said innovation takes many forms, including an entrepreneur developing a cutting edge technology that can impact the world, or a mother looking for a more efficient way to raise her family, and a high school student deciding to enter into college at the age of 14, or a displaced worker stepping back into an educational setting after 20 years in the workforce.

"By being here today, you all are demonstrating a commitment to innovation to the highest degree," Church said at the College’s 48th annual commencement ceremony.

The 570 graduates who participated in the ceremony were then challenged to pay forward the help they received to achieve their goal by keynote speaker Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of Innovation and Enterprise Development for the Ohio Board of Regents.

{mosimage}Cates compared earning a college degree to that of earning Eagle Scout status with the Boy Scouts – something he did many years before, he noted.

"Find someone you know that has the skills…and give them a hand to get them into the nest with you," Cates said.

This year 1,245 graduates earned an LCCC associate’s degree or certificate and of those, 99 students earned two degrees, 14 earned three degrees, one earned four degrees and one earned five degrees for a total of 1,379 degrees awarded. LCCC’s graduating class received two-year associate degrees in arts, applied business, applied science, science, individualized studies and technical studies. One-year technical certificates were also awarded.

An additional 245 students were honored for earning bachelor’s and or master’s degrees from the 10 universities in the LCCC University Partnership program.

"As the class of 2012 these graduates have taken the leap – many of them returning to school after many years – to re-tool themselves or start their educational pathway that will lead them to a satisfying career," said Church.

Also this year 56 students in the fifth class of Early College High School graduated, earning both their high school diplomas and their associate’s of arts degrees.

Early College High School is an opportunity for students entering the ninth grade to participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. They must be first-generation college students.

Also graduating from LCCC with associate of arts degrees were 18 Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) students representing nine different school districts. The PSEO program allows high school students to earn college credits while in high school. In this program, students enroll in courses at LCCC and receive dual credit for high school requirements and college credit.

"LCCC provided me with an opportunity to graduate with a college degree and a high school diploma at the same time, so I took that opportunity," said 17-year-old Rehab Ali of Elyria. "I am thankful for LCCC, and that it can give young adults like me a chance to get farther than we’d ever imagined."

2012 Graduates Encouraged to Embrace Innovative Thinking And Help Others Reach Their Potential

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership graduates received two messages at this year’s commencement ceremony.

The first from LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church was to honor their innovative spirit and not let negative thinkers detract them from their goals.

The 570 graduates who participated in the ceremony were then challenged to pay forward the help they received to achieve their goal by keynote speaker Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of Innovation and Enterprise Development for the Ohio Board of Regents.

Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership graduates received two messages at this year’s commencement ceremony.

{mosimage}The first from LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church was to honor their innovative spirit and not let negative thinkers detract them from their goals.

"Throughout history, that is what innovators have done. They’ve looked into the face of doubt, regardless of the source, and chose to ignore it. And in doing so, they’ve achieved incredible things," Church said. "Just think what wouldn’t be today if people didn’t push themselves to reach the highest degree of innovation they could; if they didn’t invent new things."

He said innovation takes many forms, including an entrepreneur developing a cutting edge technology that can impact the world, or a mother looking for a more efficient way to raise her family, and a high school student deciding to enter into college at the age of 14, or a displaced worker stepping back into an educational setting after 20 years in the workforce.

"By being here today, you all are demonstrating a commitment to innovation to the highest degree," Church said at the College’s 48th annual commencement ceremony.

The 570 graduates who participated in the ceremony were then challenged to pay forward the help they received to achieve their goal by keynote speaker Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of Innovation and Enterprise Development for the Ohio Board of Regents.

{mosimage}Cates compared earning a college degree to that of earning Eagle Scout status with the Boy Scouts – something he did many years before, he noted.

"Find someone you know that has the skills…and give them a hand to get them into the nest with you," Cates said.

This year 1,245 graduates earned an LCCC associate’s degree or certificate and of those, 99 students earned two degrees, 14 earned three degrees, one earned four degrees and one earned five degrees for a total of 1,379 degrees awarded. LCCC’s graduating class received two-year associate degrees in arts, applied business, applied science, science, individualized studies and technical studies. One-year technical certificates were also awarded.

An additional 245 students were honored for earning bachelor’s and or master’s degrees from the 10 universities in the LCCC University Partnership program.

"As the class of 2012 these graduates have taken the leap – many of them returning to school after many years – to re-tool themselves or start their educational pathway that will lead them to a satisfying career," said Church.

Also this year 56 students in the fifth class of Early College High School graduated, earning both their high school diplomas and their associate’s of arts degrees.

Early College High School is an opportunity for students entering the ninth grade to participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. They must be first-generation college students.

Also graduating from LCCC with associate of arts degrees were 18 Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) students representing nine different school districts. The PSEO program allows high school students to earn college credits while in high school. In this program, students enroll in courses at LCCC and receive dual credit for high school requirements and college credit.

"LCCC provided me with an opportunity to graduate with a college degree and a high school diploma at the same time, so I took that opportunity," said 17-year-old Rehab Ali of Elyria. "I am thankful for LCCC, and that it can give young adults like me a chance to get farther than we’d ever imagined."

2012 Graduates Encouraged to Embrace Innovative Thinking And Help Others Reach Their Potential

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership graduates received two messages at this year’s commencement ceremony.

The first from LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church was to honor their innovative spirit and not let negative thinkers detract them from their goals.

The 570 graduates who participated in the ceremony were then challenged to pay forward the help they received to achieve their goal by keynote speaker Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of Innovation and Enterprise Development for the Ohio Board of Regents.

Lorain County Community College and its University Partnership graduates received two messages at this year’s commencement ceremony.

{mosimage}The first from LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church was to honor their innovative spirit and not let negative thinkers detract them from their goals.

"Throughout history, that is what innovators have done. They’ve looked into the face of doubt, regardless of the source, and chose to ignore it. And in doing so, they’ve achieved incredible things," Church said. "Just think what wouldn’t be today if people didn’t push themselves to reach the highest degree of innovation they could; if they didn’t invent new things."

He said innovation takes many forms, including an entrepreneur developing a cutting edge technology that can impact the world, or a mother looking for a more efficient way to raise her family, and a high school student deciding to enter into college at the age of 14, or a displaced worker stepping back into an educational setting after 20 years in the workforce.

"By being here today, you all are demonstrating a commitment to innovation to the highest degree," Church said at the College’s 48th annual commencement ceremony.

The 570 graduates who participated in the ceremony were then challenged to pay forward the help they received to achieve their goal by keynote speaker Gary Cates, senior vice chancellor of Innovation and Enterprise Development for the Ohio Board of Regents.

{mosimage}Cates compared earning a college degree to that of earning Eagle Scout status with the Boy Scouts – something he did many years before, he noted.

"Find someone you know that has the skills…and give them a hand to get them into the nest with you," Cates said.

This year 1,245 graduates earned an LCCC associate’s degree or certificate and of those, 99 students earned two degrees, 14 earned three degrees, one earned four degrees and one earned five degrees for a total of 1,379 degrees awarded. LCCC’s graduating class received two-year associate degrees in arts, applied business, applied science, science, individualized studies and technical studies. One-year technical certificates were also awarded.

An additional 245 students were honored for earning bachelor’s and or master’s degrees from the 10 universities in the LCCC University Partnership program.

"As the class of 2012 these graduates have taken the leap – many of them returning to school after many years – to re-tool themselves or start their educational pathway that will lead them to a satisfying career," said Church.

Also this year 56 students in the fifth class of Early College High School graduated, earning both their high school diplomas and their associate’s of arts degrees.

Early College High School is an opportunity for students entering the ninth grade to participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. They must be first-generation college students.

Also graduating from LCCC with associate of arts degrees were 18 Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) students representing nine different school districts. The PSEO program allows high school students to earn college credits while in high school. In this program, students enroll in courses at LCCC and receive dual credit for high school requirements and college credit.

"LCCC provided me with an opportunity to graduate with a college degree and a high school diploma at the same time, so I took that opportunity," said 17-year-old Rehab Ali of Elyria. "I am thankful for LCCC, and that it can give young adults like me a chance to get farther than we’d ever imagined."

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