Professor Mark McKinley Owns World Record for Largest Talking Clock Collection

{mosimage}Mark B. McKinley is a man with time on his mind, as well as on his walls, desk, shelves, stairs and tables. In fact, most everywhere McKinley looks in his Amherst home he will see – and hear – a clock.

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection as recorded by the Guinness Book of World Records. The official Guinness count is 782, but McKinley has amassed at least 150 more clocks since his world record authentication in 2010.

Mark B. McKinley is a man with time on his mind, as well as on his walls, desk, shelves, stairs and tables. In fact, most everywhere McKinley looks in his Amherst home he will see – and hear – a clock.

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection as recorded by the Guinness Book of World Records. The official Guinness count is 782, but McKinley has amassed at least 150 more clocks since his world record authentication in 2010.

{mosimage}The Guinness application process was an extensive endeavor. In additional to detailed records of each clock, Guinness required a notarized witness statement from at least two "prominent and respected members of the community."

"I was fortunate to secure David Taylor, Mayor of Amherst and Jeffrey Riddell, CEO of Consumers Builders Supply, as my prominent and respected members of the community," McKinley said.

His impressive assortment spans from functional alarm clocks to funky coo-coo clocks and hits every niche in between. Not bad for a man who unassumingly purchased his first talking clock in 1990.

"I needed to find a talking clock for my mother, who was sight impaired," he recalled.

He went on to purchase a few more talking pieces that year before his daughter gave him a novelty talking clock as a gift. He then started to actively seek out the audible time keepers, finding them at garage sales and online auctions. For many years, he received clocks as gifts. These days, however, friends and family don’t buy him clocks.

"No one can buy clocks for me anymore because I have them all," he mused.

McKinley keeps his collection growing by daily searching eBay and other online sales. He continually seeks talking clock memorabilia, but sometimes the clock talk comes to him. As the founder and president of the International Society of Talking Clock Collectors, McKinley maintains a virtual clock museum and engages in clock and time discussions with ISTCC members and others who share his love of time. He recently published "TICk TOCk Talk: The Collected History and Significance of Talking Clocks" and has received widespread media attention for his books and articles on time and the psychology of collecting. His YouTube videos of talking clocks have received more than 740,000 hits – including 35,000 views each for videos that feature Star Wars, Simpsons, Hello Kitty and Bratz dolls.

"Talking clocks can serve a lot of functions for people," he explained. "For the sight impaired, they are a necessity. For many others, talking clocks bring them audio time announcement and for others simply amusement."

McKinley, who has a Ph. D. in psychology and teaches multiple psychology courses at LCCC, focuses much of his research and writing on subjects related to time. He will soon finish his fifth book, "Damn It, It’s About Time: Psychological Wonderments in the 4th Dimension," which explores the psychology of egocentric time. A long term goal of his is to build a bricks-and-mortar Talking Clock Museum. To this end he has been in discussion with a number of civic organizations, including the Amherst Historical Society.

"I enjoy examining time from multiple perspectives, such as the ways various cultures interpret time," McKinley said. Time is a preoccupying factor in many human events, he said, such as sports, high finance, music and song.

McKinley admits that all the talk about time has him highly aware of how he spends each minute.

"I don’t like things that use up too much time, like waiting in line at the grocery store or a slow computer or a game of golf that moves too slowly."

One place he has invested a large amount of time is at LCCC. As one of the first faculty members hired when LCCC first opened in 1966.  He likes to note that "he came with the bricks." McKinley has been teaching students for 46 years and will retire at the end of May.

"I’m fortunate that I’ve been able to wake up every day and come do something I enjoy," McKinley said.

While McKinley tries to enjoy each minute, he does get bogged down twice a year in a chore he finds most disagreeable: adjusting his clocks for Daylight Saving Time. Each autumn, he and his wife, Susan, spend about nine hours resetting clocks; the spring adjustment takes about six hours
That’s 540 and 360 minutes respectively, and McKinley is acutely aware of each one.

"I find it extremely irritating to have to spend so much time changing the time," he said.

The reset routine includes changing the batteries – a costly measure that requires more than a thousand batteries each year. Through the years, McKinley has developed a loyalty to Energizer batteries.

"I don’t know what it is; they just work best for clocks," he said.

To learn more about McKinley’s clocks or view the online museum, visit www.istcc.org. His YouTube videos can be found by searching "gladstone555."

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection.

Professor Mark McKinley Owns World Record for Largest Talking Clock Collection

{mosimage}Mark B. McKinley is a man with time on his mind, as well as on his walls, desk, shelves, stairs and tables. In fact, most everywhere McKinley looks in his Amherst home he will see – and hear – a clock.

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection as recorded by the Guinness Book of World Records. The official Guinness count is 782, but McKinley has amassed at least 150 more clocks since his world record authentication in 2010.

Mark B. McKinley is a man with time on his mind, as well as on his walls, desk, shelves, stairs and tables. In fact, most everywhere McKinley looks in his Amherst home he will see – and hear – a clock.

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection as recorded by the Guinness Book of World Records. The official Guinness count is 782, but McKinley has amassed at least 150 more clocks since his world record authentication in 2010.

{mosimage}The Guinness application process was an extensive endeavor. In additional to detailed records of each clock, Guinness required a notarized witness statement from at least two "prominent and respected members of the community."

"I was fortunate to secure David Taylor, Mayor of Amherst and Jeffrey Riddell, CEO of Consumers Builders Supply, as my prominent and respected members of the community," McKinley said.

His impressive assortment spans from functional alarm clocks to funky coo-coo clocks and hits every niche in between. Not bad for a man who unassumingly purchased his first talking clock in 1990.

"I needed to find a talking clock for my mother, who was sight impaired," he recalled.

He went on to purchase a few more talking pieces that year before his daughter gave him a novelty talking clock as a gift. He then started to actively seek out the audible time keepers, finding them at garage sales and online auctions. For many years, he received clocks as gifts. These days, however, friends and family don’t buy him clocks.

"No one can buy clocks for me anymore because I have them all," he mused.

McKinley keeps his collection growing by daily searching eBay and other online sales. He continually seeks talking clock memorabilia, but sometimes the clock talk comes to him. As the founder and president of the International Society of Talking Clock Collectors, McKinley maintains a virtual clock museum and engages in clock and time discussions with ISTCC members and others who share his love of time. He recently published "TICk TOCk Talk: The Collected History and Significance of Talking Clocks" and has received widespread media attention for his books and articles on time and the psychology of collecting. His YouTube videos of talking clocks have received more than 740,000 hits – including 35,000 views each for videos that feature Star Wars, Simpsons, Hello Kitty and Bratz dolls.

"Talking clocks can serve a lot of functions for people," he explained. "For the sight impaired, they are a necessity. For many others, talking clocks bring them audio time announcement and for others simply amusement."

McKinley, who has a Ph. D. in psychology and teaches multiple psychology courses at LCCC, focuses much of his research and writing on subjects related to time. He will soon finish his fifth book, "Damn It, It’s About Time: Psychological Wonderments in the 4th Dimension," which explores the psychology of egocentric time. A long term goal of his is to build a bricks-and-mortar Talking Clock Museum. To this end he has been in discussion with a number of civic organizations, including the Amherst Historical Society.

"I enjoy examining time from multiple perspectives, such as the ways various cultures interpret time," McKinley said. Time is a preoccupying factor in many human events, he said, such as sports, high finance, music and song.

McKinley admits that all the talk about time has him highly aware of how he spends each minute.

"I don’t like things that use up too much time, like waiting in line at the grocery store or a slow computer or a game of golf that moves too slowly."

One place he has invested a large amount of time is at LCCC. As one of the first faculty members hired when LCCC first opened in 1966.  He likes to note that "he came with the bricks." McKinley has been teaching students for 46 years and will retire at the end of May.

"I’m fortunate that I’ve been able to wake up every day and come do something I enjoy," McKinley said.

While McKinley tries to enjoy each minute, he does get bogged down twice a year in a chore he finds most disagreeable: adjusting his clocks for Daylight Saving Time. Each autumn, he and his wife, Susan, spend about nine hours resetting clocks; the spring adjustment takes about six hours
That’s 540 and 360 minutes respectively, and McKinley is acutely aware of each one.

"I find it extremely irritating to have to spend so much time changing the time," he said.

The reset routine includes changing the batteries – a costly measure that requires more than a thousand batteries each year. Through the years, McKinley has developed a loyalty to Energizer batteries.

"I don’t know what it is; they just work best for clocks," he said.

To learn more about McKinley’s clocks or view the online museum, visit www.istcc.org. His YouTube videos can be found by searching "gladstone555."

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection.

Professor Mark McKinley Owns World Record for Largest Talking Clock Collection

{mosimage}Mark B. McKinley is a man with time on his mind, as well as on his walls, desk, shelves, stairs and tables. In fact, most everywhere McKinley looks in his Amherst home he will see – and hear – a clock.

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection as recorded by the Guinness Book of World Records. The official Guinness count is 782, but McKinley has amassed at least 150 more clocks since his world record authentication in 2010.

Mark B. McKinley is a man with time on his mind, as well as on his walls, desk, shelves, stairs and tables. In fact, most everywhere McKinley looks in his Amherst home he will see – and hear – a clock.

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection as recorded by the Guinness Book of World Records. The official Guinness count is 782, but McKinley has amassed at least 150 more clocks since his world record authentication in 2010.

{mosimage}The Guinness application process was an extensive endeavor. In additional to detailed records of each clock, Guinness required a notarized witness statement from at least two "prominent and respected members of the community."

"I was fortunate to secure David Taylor, Mayor of Amherst and Jeffrey Riddell, CEO of Consumers Builders Supply, as my prominent and respected members of the community," McKinley said.

His impressive assortment spans from functional alarm clocks to funky coo-coo clocks and hits every niche in between. Not bad for a man who unassumingly purchased his first talking clock in 1990.

"I needed to find a talking clock for my mother, who was sight impaired," he recalled.

He went on to purchase a few more talking pieces that year before his daughter gave him a novelty talking clock as a gift. He then started to actively seek out the audible time keepers, finding them at garage sales and online auctions. For many years, he received clocks as gifts. These days, however, friends and family don’t buy him clocks.

"No one can buy clocks for me anymore because I have them all," he mused.

McKinley keeps his collection growing by daily searching eBay and other online sales. He continually seeks talking clock memorabilia, but sometimes the clock talk comes to him. As the founder and president of the International Society of Talking Clock Collectors, McKinley maintains a virtual clock museum and engages in clock and time discussions with ISTCC members and others who share his love of time. He recently published "TICk TOCk Talk: The Collected History and Significance of Talking Clocks" and has received widespread media attention for his books and articles on time and the psychology of collecting. His YouTube videos of talking clocks have received more than 740,000 hits – including 35,000 views each for videos that feature Star Wars, Simpsons, Hello Kitty and Bratz dolls.

"Talking clocks can serve a lot of functions for people," he explained. "For the sight impaired, they are a necessity. For many others, talking clocks bring them audio time announcement and for others simply amusement."

McKinley, who has a Ph. D. in psychology and teaches multiple psychology courses at LCCC, focuses much of his research and writing on subjects related to time. He will soon finish his fifth book, "Damn It, It’s About Time: Psychological Wonderments in the 4th Dimension," which explores the psychology of egocentric time. A long term goal of his is to build a bricks-and-mortar Talking Clock Museum. To this end he has been in discussion with a number of civic organizations, including the Amherst Historical Society.

"I enjoy examining time from multiple perspectives, such as the ways various cultures interpret time," McKinley said. Time is a preoccupying factor in many human events, he said, such as sports, high finance, music and song.

McKinley admits that all the talk about time has him highly aware of how he spends each minute.

"I don’t like things that use up too much time, like waiting in line at the grocery store or a slow computer or a game of golf that moves too slowly."

One place he has invested a large amount of time is at LCCC. As one of the first faculty members hired when LCCC first opened in 1966.  He likes to note that "he came with the bricks." McKinley has been teaching students for 46 years and will retire at the end of May.

"I’m fortunate that I’ve been able to wake up every day and come do something I enjoy," McKinley said.

While McKinley tries to enjoy each minute, he does get bogged down twice a year in a chore he finds most disagreeable: adjusting his clocks for Daylight Saving Time. Each autumn, he and his wife, Susan, spend about nine hours resetting clocks; the spring adjustment takes about six hours
That’s 540 and 360 minutes respectively, and McKinley is acutely aware of each one.

"I find it extremely irritating to have to spend so much time changing the time," he said.

The reset routine includes changing the batteries – a costly measure that requires more than a thousand batteries each year. Through the years, McKinley has developed a loyalty to Energizer batteries.

"I don’t know what it is; they just work best for clocks," he said.

To learn more about McKinley’s clocks or view the online museum, visit www.istcc.org. His YouTube videos can be found by searching "gladstone555."

The Lorain County Community College professor has bragging rights to the world’s largest talking clock collection.

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