Film Maker Gets “Reel” Education; LCCC First Stop in His Journey to Silver Screen

{mosimage}Timothy Johnson started his film career in the arts program at Lorain County Community College.

Timothy Johnson always wanted to make movies.

In the fall of 1989, fresh out of Elyria West High School, he started his journey at Lorain County Community College. Johnson earned an associate of arts degree from LCCC in 1991 and was accepted at New York University where he received his bachelor’s of fine arts.

Timothy Johnson started his film career in the arts program at Lorain County Community College.

{mosimage}Timothy Johnson always wanted to make movies.

In the fall of 1989, fresh out of Elyria West High School, he started his journey at Lorain County Community College. Johnson earned an associate of arts degree from LCCC in 1991 and was accepted at New York University where he received his bachelor’s of fine arts.

"By coming here I was able to transfer into the NYU film school and get my bachelor of fine arts in only five semesters, which was a significant cost savings," Johnson said.

This winter, he came home to the Stocker Arts Center on the LCCC campus to screen "Take Shelter," a highly acclaimed movie on which he served as first assistant director. Another Northeast Ohio native, Tyler Davidson, who brought Johnson on to act as the production supervisor, produced the film independently. Johnson later took on the first assistant role for the film when no one else was hired for the job.

Portions of the film were shot in Lorain County, including the former Elyria West High School – where Johnson graduated. The film was produced during the summer of 2010.

"In terms of what I learned here (at LCCC), it provided me with editing skills that I used at NYU and it was the place where I created my short film that got me accepted into NYU. It got me excited about the process of film making," Johnson said.
    

    

He earned his associate of arts degree in what was then called the pre-professional media program.

"I have done everything there is to do in the production process. I moved back to Cleveland from Los Angeles in 2002 doing mostly commercials. I’ve also worked in the set decorating department for the ‘Avengers’," he said.

Johnson’s ultimate goal is to be a full-time independent feature film producer. "In the meantime I have to eat so I work on other projects that come up," he said.

In the case of "Take Shelter" it gave him valuable experience doing work on a feature film that he’d never done before. Some of the things he’s done in the film industry include photography, lighting, sound, stop-motion animation, and short-film direction. "Each new experience in the process is important," he said.

Coming back to LCCC to share his experiences was an honor he said. "I enjoy the idea of people who are eager to hear someone who has 15 years in the business. I love to share my experience. I love being a mentor and sharing my stories," Johnson said.

And many movies couldn’t be made without the help of a lot of ordinary people.

"I appreciate the generosity of people who say ‘Yeah you can shoot your movie here,’ then when we come they say ‘Oh my god, you have so much equipment and you’re going to do what to my house?’  Luckily people are good sports and allow film makers to continue to do these crazy things," Johnson said.

The Cleveland International Film Festival is now recognizing his work as a producer. "Christ in Gethsemane," was selected to screen at the recently completed 36th Cleveland International Film Festival in the Ohio Shorts Program. Johnson is a producer on this film.

Film Maker Gets “Reel” Education; LCCC First Stop in His Journey to Silver Screen

{mosimage}Timothy Johnson started his film career in the arts program at Lorain County Community College.

Timothy Johnson always wanted to make movies.

In the fall of 1989, fresh out of Elyria West High School, he started his journey at Lorain County Community College. Johnson earned an associate of arts degree from LCCC in 1991 and was accepted at New York University where he received his bachelor’s of fine arts.

Timothy Johnson started his film career in the arts program at Lorain County Community College.

{mosimage}Timothy Johnson always wanted to make movies.

In the fall of 1989, fresh out of Elyria West High School, he started his journey at Lorain County Community College. Johnson earned an associate of arts degree from LCCC in 1991 and was accepted at New York University where he received his bachelor’s of fine arts.

"By coming here I was able to transfer into the NYU film school and get my bachelor of fine arts in only five semesters, which was a significant cost savings," Johnson said.

This winter, he came home to the Stocker Arts Center on the LCCC campus to screen "Take Shelter," a highly acclaimed movie on which he served as first assistant director. Another Northeast Ohio native, Tyler Davidson, who brought Johnson on to act as the production supervisor, produced the film independently. Johnson later took on the first assistant role for the film when no one else was hired for the job.

Portions of the film were shot in Lorain County, including the former Elyria West High School – where Johnson graduated. The film was produced during the summer of 2010.

"In terms of what I learned here (at LCCC), it provided me with editing skills that I used at NYU and it was the place where I created my short film that got me accepted into NYU. It got me excited about the process of film making," Johnson said.
    

    

He earned his associate of arts degree in what was then called the pre-professional media program.

"I have done everything there is to do in the production process. I moved back to Cleveland from Los Angeles in 2002 doing mostly commercials. I’ve also worked in the set decorating department for the ‘Avengers’," he said.

Johnson’s ultimate goal is to be a full-time independent feature film producer. "In the meantime I have to eat so I work on other projects that come up," he said.

In the case of "Take Shelter" it gave him valuable experience doing work on a feature film that he’d never done before. Some of the things he’s done in the film industry include photography, lighting, sound, stop-motion animation, and short-film direction. "Each new experience in the process is important," he said.

Coming back to LCCC to share his experiences was an honor he said. "I enjoy the idea of people who are eager to hear someone who has 15 years in the business. I love to share my experience. I love being a mentor and sharing my stories," Johnson said.

And many movies couldn’t be made without the help of a lot of ordinary people.

"I appreciate the generosity of people who say ‘Yeah you can shoot your movie here,’ then when we come they say ‘Oh my god, you have so much equipment and you’re going to do what to my house?’  Luckily people are good sports and allow film makers to continue to do these crazy things," Johnson said.

The Cleveland International Film Festival is now recognizing his work as a producer. "Christ in Gethsemane," was selected to screen at the recently completed 36th Cleveland International Film Festival in the Ohio Shorts Program. Johnson is a producer on this film.

Film Maker Gets “Reel” Education; LCCC First Stop in His Journey to Silver Screen

{mosimage}Timothy Johnson started his film career in the arts program at Lorain County Community College.

Timothy Johnson always wanted to make movies.

In the fall of 1989, fresh out of Elyria West High School, he started his journey at Lorain County Community College. Johnson earned an associate of arts degree from LCCC in 1991 and was accepted at New York University where he received his bachelor’s of fine arts.

Timothy Johnson started his film career in the arts program at Lorain County Community College.

{mosimage}Timothy Johnson always wanted to make movies.

In the fall of 1989, fresh out of Elyria West High School, he started his journey at Lorain County Community College. Johnson earned an associate of arts degree from LCCC in 1991 and was accepted at New York University where he received his bachelor’s of fine arts.

"By coming here I was able to transfer into the NYU film school and get my bachelor of fine arts in only five semesters, which was a significant cost savings," Johnson said.

This winter, he came home to the Stocker Arts Center on the LCCC campus to screen "Take Shelter," a highly acclaimed movie on which he served as first assistant director. Another Northeast Ohio native, Tyler Davidson, who brought Johnson on to act as the production supervisor, produced the film independently. Johnson later took on the first assistant role for the film when no one else was hired for the job.

Portions of the film were shot in Lorain County, including the former Elyria West High School – where Johnson graduated. The film was produced during the summer of 2010.

"In terms of what I learned here (at LCCC), it provided me with editing skills that I used at NYU and it was the place where I created my short film that got me accepted into NYU. It got me excited about the process of film making," Johnson said.
    

    

He earned his associate of arts degree in what was then called the pre-professional media program.

"I have done everything there is to do in the production process. I moved back to Cleveland from Los Angeles in 2002 doing mostly commercials. I’ve also worked in the set decorating department for the ‘Avengers’," he said.

Johnson’s ultimate goal is to be a full-time independent feature film producer. "In the meantime I have to eat so I work on other projects that come up," he said.

In the case of "Take Shelter" it gave him valuable experience doing work on a feature film that he’d never done before. Some of the things he’s done in the film industry include photography, lighting, sound, stop-motion animation, and short-film direction. "Each new experience in the process is important," he said.

Coming back to LCCC to share his experiences was an honor he said. "I enjoy the idea of people who are eager to hear someone who has 15 years in the business. I love to share my experience. I love being a mentor and sharing my stories," Johnson said.

And many movies couldn’t be made without the help of a lot of ordinary people.

"I appreciate the generosity of people who say ‘Yeah you can shoot your movie here,’ then when we come they say ‘Oh my god, you have so much equipment and you’re going to do what to my house?’  Luckily people are good sports and allow film makers to continue to do these crazy things," Johnson said.

The Cleveland International Film Festival is now recognizing his work as a producer. "Christ in Gethsemane," was selected to screen at the recently completed 36th Cleveland International Film Festival in the Ohio Shorts Program. Johnson is a producer on this film.

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