LCCC Named One of Top 120 Community Colleges in U.S. by Aspen Institute; Only One in Ohio

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College was named recently as one of the top 120 community colleges in the United States – and the only one in Ohio – by the Aspen Institute.

Lorain County Community College was named recently as one of the top 120 community colleges in the United States – and the only one in Ohio – by the Aspen Institute.

{mosimage}"This is an indication that Lorain County Community College is committed to the success of its students," said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church. "We know that earning a college degree is increasingly necessary in today’s economy and we have to do all we can to help our students be successful in reaching that goal."

The Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program ranked the top 120 community colleges from among 1,200 across the country using publicly available data on student outcomes.

An expert advisory committee co-chaired by William Trueheart, CEO of Achieving the Dream, and Keith Bird, former chancellor of the Kentucky Community College System, analyzed the data. The data focused on completion, considered from three perspectives, with each weighed equally:

  • Performance – retention, graduation rates including transfers, and degrees and certificates per 100 "full time equivalent" students
  • Improvement – improvement of completion performance over time
  • Equity – institutional record for completion outcomes for disadvantaged students.

    
"Unprecedented numbers of students are choosing to attend community college as the cost of four-year college grows increasingly out of reach for many families in America. To ensure student success and fuel economic growth for communities and the nation, community colleges must—now more than ever—make a commitment to excellence and stronger student outcomes," said Aspen Institute College Excellence Program Executive Director Josh Wyner.

Each of the community colleges ranked has demonstrated high standards for learning, college completion without delay and that they are training grounds for jobs that pay competitive wages, according to the Aspen Institute.

"Lorain County residents are determined to prepare themselves for changes our economy is going through," said Church. "They understand that education is the key and the best educational resources they have is LCCC."

Enrollment at LCCC has more than doubled in the last decade as nearly 17,000 students attend classes annually.

The Aspen College Excellence Program aims to identify and replicate campus-wide practices that significantly improve college student outcomes.  Through the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, projects targeting a new generation of college leaders, and other initiatives, the College Excellence Program works to improve colleges’ understanding and capacity to teach and graduate students, especially the growing population of low-income and minority students on American campuses.  

The 120 community colleges named are eligible to submit applications containing detailed data on degree/certificate completion (including progress and transfer rates), labor market outcomes (employment and earnings) and student learning outcomes for the Aspen Prize. They must demonstrate that they deliver exceptional student results, use data to drive decisions, and continually improve over time.

Eight to ten finalists will be named in September. The Aspen Institute will conduct site visits to each of the finalists in the fall. Based on this evidence, the Prize Jury will select a grand prizewinner of approximately $700,000 and two-to-three runners-up, to be announced in December.

The Aspen Institute prize was announced at the White House Community College Summit hosted by President Barack Obama and Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden in October.

Dr. Biden, a lifelong educator who continues to teach English at Northern Virginia Community College, noted, "The country is becoming increasingly aware of the importance of community colleges in educating our way to a stronger America. I am inspired by all of today’s community college students – the workers who have returned to school to improve their job prospects, the mothers who juggle jobs and childcare while preparing for new careers, and those who work diligently while at community college, preparing to transfer to a four-year institution."

The Aspen Institute prize is funded by the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation for Education, the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, and the JPMorgan Chase Foundation.

The Aspen Institute is a non-profit organization that fosters value-based leadership, encourages individuals to reflect on ideas that define a good society, and provides a neutral venue for discussing critical issues. It is based in Washington, D.C. 

For more information on the Aspen Institute visit www.aspeninstitute.org.

LCCC Named One of Top 120 Community Colleges in U.S. by Aspen Institute; Only One in Ohio

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College was named recently as one of the top 120 community colleges in the United States – and the only one in Ohio – by the Aspen Institute.

Lorain County Community College was named recently as one of the top 120 community colleges in the United States – and the only one in Ohio – by the Aspen Institute.

{mosimage}"This is an indication that Lorain County Community College is committed to the success of its students," said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church. "We know that earning a college degree is increasingly necessary in today’s economy and we have to do all we can to help our students be successful in reaching that goal."

The Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program ranked the top 120 community colleges from among 1,200 across the country using publicly available data on student outcomes.

An expert advisory committee co-chaired by William Trueheart, CEO of Achieving the Dream, and Keith Bird, former chancellor of the Kentucky Community College System, analyzed the data. The data focused on completion, considered from three perspectives, with each weighed equally:

  • Performance – retention, graduation rates including transfers, and degrees and certificates per 100 "full time equivalent" students
  • Improvement – improvement of completion performance over time
  • Equity – institutional record for completion outcomes for disadvantaged students.

    
"Unprecedented numbers of students are choosing to attend community college as the cost of four-year college grows increasingly out of reach for many families in America. To ensure student success and fuel economic growth for communities and the nation, community colleges must—now more than ever—make a commitment to excellence and stronger student outcomes," said Aspen Institute College Excellence Program Executive Director Josh Wyner.

Each of the community colleges ranked has demonstrated high standards for learning, college completion without delay and that they are training grounds for jobs that pay competitive wages, according to the Aspen Institute.

"Lorain County residents are determined to prepare themselves for changes our economy is going through," said Church. "They understand that education is the key and the best educational resources they have is LCCC."

Enrollment at LCCC has more than doubled in the last decade as nearly 17,000 students attend classes annually.

The Aspen College Excellence Program aims to identify and replicate campus-wide practices that significantly improve college student outcomes.  Through the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, projects targeting a new generation of college leaders, and other initiatives, the College Excellence Program works to improve colleges’ understanding and capacity to teach and graduate students, especially the growing population of low-income and minority students on American campuses.  

The 120 community colleges named are eligible to submit applications containing detailed data on degree/certificate completion (including progress and transfer rates), labor market outcomes (employment and earnings) and student learning outcomes for the Aspen Prize. They must demonstrate that they deliver exceptional student results, use data to drive decisions, and continually improve over time.

Eight to ten finalists will be named in September. The Aspen Institute will conduct site visits to each of the finalists in the fall. Based on this evidence, the Prize Jury will select a grand prizewinner of approximately $700,000 and two-to-three runners-up, to be announced in December.

The Aspen Institute prize was announced at the White House Community College Summit hosted by President Barack Obama and Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden in October.

Dr. Biden, a lifelong educator who continues to teach English at Northern Virginia Community College, noted, "The country is becoming increasingly aware of the importance of community colleges in educating our way to a stronger America. I am inspired by all of today’s community college students – the workers who have returned to school to improve their job prospects, the mothers who juggle jobs and childcare while preparing for new careers, and those who work diligently while at community college, preparing to transfer to a four-year institution."

The Aspen Institute prize is funded by the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation for Education, the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, and the JPMorgan Chase Foundation.

The Aspen Institute is a non-profit organization that fosters value-based leadership, encourages individuals to reflect on ideas that define a good society, and provides a neutral venue for discussing critical issues. It is based in Washington, D.C. 

For more information on the Aspen Institute visit www.aspeninstitute.org.

LCCC Named One of Top 120 Community Colleges in U.S. by Aspen Institute; Only One in Ohio

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College was named recently as one of the top 120 community colleges in the United States – and the only one in Ohio – by the Aspen Institute.

Lorain County Community College was named recently as one of the top 120 community colleges in the United States – and the only one in Ohio – by the Aspen Institute.

{mosimage}"This is an indication that Lorain County Community College is committed to the success of its students," said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church. "We know that earning a college degree is increasingly necessary in today’s economy and we have to do all we can to help our students be successful in reaching that goal."

The Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program ranked the top 120 community colleges from among 1,200 across the country using publicly available data on student outcomes.

An expert advisory committee co-chaired by William Trueheart, CEO of Achieving the Dream, and Keith Bird, former chancellor of the Kentucky Community College System, analyzed the data. The data focused on completion, considered from three perspectives, with each weighed equally:

  • Performance – retention, graduation rates including transfers, and degrees and certificates per 100 "full time equivalent" students
  • Improvement – improvement of completion performance over time
  • Equity – institutional record for completion outcomes for disadvantaged students.

    
"Unprecedented numbers of students are choosing to attend community college as the cost of four-year college grows increasingly out of reach for many families in America. To ensure student success and fuel economic growth for communities and the nation, community colleges must—now more than ever—make a commitment to excellence and stronger student outcomes," said Aspen Institute College Excellence Program Executive Director Josh Wyner.

Each of the community colleges ranked has demonstrated high standards for learning, college completion without delay and that they are training grounds for jobs that pay competitive wages, according to the Aspen Institute.

"Lorain County residents are determined to prepare themselves for changes our economy is going through," said Church. "They understand that education is the key and the best educational resources they have is LCCC."

Enrollment at LCCC has more than doubled in the last decade as nearly 17,000 students attend classes annually.

The Aspen College Excellence Program aims to identify and replicate campus-wide practices that significantly improve college student outcomes.  Through the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, projects targeting a new generation of college leaders, and other initiatives, the College Excellence Program works to improve colleges’ understanding and capacity to teach and graduate students, especially the growing population of low-income and minority students on American campuses.  

The 120 community colleges named are eligible to submit applications containing detailed data on degree/certificate completion (including progress and transfer rates), labor market outcomes (employment and earnings) and student learning outcomes for the Aspen Prize. They must demonstrate that they deliver exceptional student results, use data to drive decisions, and continually improve over time.

Eight to ten finalists will be named in September. The Aspen Institute will conduct site visits to each of the finalists in the fall. Based on this evidence, the Prize Jury will select a grand prizewinner of approximately $700,000 and two-to-three runners-up, to be announced in December.

The Aspen Institute prize was announced at the White House Community College Summit hosted by President Barack Obama and Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden in October.

Dr. Biden, a lifelong educator who continues to teach English at Northern Virginia Community College, noted, "The country is becoming increasingly aware of the importance of community colleges in educating our way to a stronger America. I am inspired by all of today’s community college students – the workers who have returned to school to improve their job prospects, the mothers who juggle jobs and childcare while preparing for new careers, and those who work diligently while at community college, preparing to transfer to a four-year institution."

The Aspen Institute prize is funded by the Joyce Foundation, the Lumina Foundation for Education, the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, and the JPMorgan Chase Foundation.

The Aspen Institute is a non-profit organization that fosters value-based leadership, encourages individuals to reflect on ideas that define a good society, and provides a neutral venue for discussing critical issues. It is based in Washington, D.C. 

For more information on the Aspen Institute visit www.aspeninstitute.org.

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