Students Make a Positive Impact with LCCC’s Service Learning

{mosimage}Learning takes many forms at Lorain County Community College. For students in classes with service…

{mosimage}Learning takes many forms at Lorain County Community College. For students in classes with service learning components, their coursework may require them to get their hands dirty, work with the homeless or teach families about healthy eating.

A form of experiential education, service learning integrates community service and civic responsibility with academic instruction. Reflective thinking, a key component of service learning, connects the service to the learning and is what makes the action different from volunteering.

"Service learning allows students to make a difference in their community by applying what they are learning in the classroom," explained Marcia Jones, LCCC project director for Service Learning and Career Services Manager in the Employment and Career Services office.

The service learning program at LCCC officially began four years ago as a grassroots movement among faculty, students, staff and community partners. To date, nearly 20 LCCC instructors have incorporated service learning in 54 classes. The result has been more than 1,345 students clocking more than 17,000 hours of service.

With four key community partners – Save Our Children, Early College High School, Second Harvest Food Bank and the Lorain County Urban League – service learning offers LCCC students an abundance of opportunities to make a positive impact in Lorain County.

With a focus on the No Child Left Inside initiative, a national movement working to address childhood obesity and youth disconnect from nature, service learning students in Allied Health and Nursing courses have worked with Lorain County Urban League to teach low-income families about healthy eating habits. The LCUL outreach program Save Our Families works to reduce obesity and prevent diabetes among African American and Hispanic children and their families.

"We are fortunate to have the Service Learning Program at LCCC as a strategic partner," said Peter Ogbuji, director of programs and development for the Lorain County Urban League. "We are grateful for the opportunity to participate in No Child Left Inside, as it dovetails perfectly with Save Our Families."

Students in Ruby Beil’s ecology and environmental monitoring courses have completed numerous projects that further the LCCC’s master landscaping plan, including water quality studies to be used in the creation of a water garden. Beil’s students have also taken their service off-campus by building a butterfly garden at the Blessing House, a children’s crisis care facility in Lorain.

To incorporate reflection into the project, Beil’s students keep a journal throughout their service experience and use their entries to answer reflection questions at the end of the project.

"The hands-on experience is much more than what any classroom can teach you. With the understanding, experiences, and great new contacts, I feel my future is getting brighter each day," said Nanette Bennington, who first experienced service learning in Beil’s courses.

Instructors interested in incorporating service learning in their courses can tailor classes to fit one of three service learning designations: Service Learning Class, which requires every student in the class to participate; Service Learning Component Class, in which each student may choose to opt in to the service learning experience; or a Service Learning Course, in which every instructor teaching the course uses service learning as a teaching and learning strategy.

LCCC introduced a new service-learning course this summer, Service Learning I. Students in the one-credit-hour course will serve at least 15 hours with one of the program’s partners and complete a reflection project. Plans are underway for the creation of Service Learning II and Service Learning III courses.

Aimee Dickinson has used the Service Learning Component Class model for many of her Introduction to Sociology courses. Through a partnership with Reclaim Lorain County, Dickinson’s students were given the option of a research assignment, or working with the nonprofit organization and then sharing a reflection report with the class.

"Service learning has been a great way to get my students in to the community and let them see firsthand the impact they can have," Dickinson said.

For more information on service learning at LCCC, visit www.lorainccc.edu/servicelearning.

Students Make a Positive Impact with LCCC’s Service Learning

{mosimage}Learning takes many forms at Lorain County Community College. For students in classes with service…

{mosimage}Learning takes many forms at Lorain County Community College. For students in classes with service learning components, their coursework may require them to get their hands dirty, work with the homeless or teach families about healthy eating.

A form of experiential education, service learning integrates community service and civic responsibility with academic instruction. Reflective thinking, a key component of service learning, connects the service to the learning and is what makes the action different from volunteering.

"Service learning allows students to make a difference in their community by applying what they are learning in the classroom," explained Marcia Jones, LCCC project director for Service Learning and Career Services Manager in the Employment and Career Services office.

The service learning program at LCCC officially began four years ago as a grassroots movement among faculty, students, staff and community partners. To date, nearly 20 LCCC instructors have incorporated service learning in 54 classes. The result has been more than 1,345 students clocking more than 17,000 hours of service.

With four key community partners – Save Our Children, Early College High School, Second Harvest Food Bank and the Lorain County Urban League – service learning offers LCCC students an abundance of opportunities to make a positive impact in Lorain County.

With a focus on the No Child Left Inside initiative, a national movement working to address childhood obesity and youth disconnect from nature, service learning students in Allied Health and Nursing courses have worked with Lorain County Urban League to teach low-income families about healthy eating habits. The LCUL outreach program Save Our Families works to reduce obesity and prevent diabetes among African American and Hispanic children and their families.

"We are fortunate to have the Service Learning Program at LCCC as a strategic partner," said Peter Ogbuji, director of programs and development for the Lorain County Urban League. "We are grateful for the opportunity to participate in No Child Left Inside, as it dovetails perfectly with Save Our Families."

Students in Ruby Beil’s ecology and environmental monitoring courses have completed numerous projects that further the LCCC’s master landscaping plan, including water quality studies to be used in the creation of a water garden. Beil’s students have also taken their service off-campus by building a butterfly garden at the Blessing House, a children’s crisis care facility in Lorain.

To incorporate reflection into the project, Beil’s students keep a journal throughout their service experience and use their entries to answer reflection questions at the end of the project.

"The hands-on experience is much more than what any classroom can teach you. With the understanding, experiences, and great new contacts, I feel my future is getting brighter each day," said Nanette Bennington, who first experienced service learning in Beil’s courses.

Instructors interested in incorporating service learning in their courses can tailor classes to fit one of three service learning designations: Service Learning Class, which requires every student in the class to participate; Service Learning Component Class, in which each student may choose to opt in to the service learning experience; or a Service Learning Course, in which every instructor teaching the course uses service learning as a teaching and learning strategy.

LCCC introduced a new service-learning course this summer, Service Learning I. Students in the one-credit-hour course will serve at least 15 hours with one of the program’s partners and complete a reflection project. Plans are underway for the creation of Service Learning II and Service Learning III courses.

Aimee Dickinson has used the Service Learning Component Class model for many of her Introduction to Sociology courses. Through a partnership with Reclaim Lorain County, Dickinson’s students were given the option of a research assignment, or working with the nonprofit organization and then sharing a reflection report with the class.

"Service learning has been a great way to get my students in to the community and let them see firsthand the impact they can have," Dickinson said.

For more information on service learning at LCCC, visit www.lorainccc.edu/servicelearning.

Students Make a Positive Impact with LCCC’s Service Learning

{mosimage}Learning takes many forms at Lorain County Community College. For students in classes with service…

{mosimage}Learning takes many forms at Lorain County Community College. For students in classes with service learning components, their coursework may require them to get their hands dirty, work with the homeless or teach families about healthy eating.

A form of experiential education, service learning integrates community service and civic responsibility with academic instruction. Reflective thinking, a key component of service learning, connects the service to the learning and is what makes the action different from volunteering.

"Service learning allows students to make a difference in their community by applying what they are learning in the classroom," explained Marcia Jones, LCCC project director for Service Learning and Career Services Manager in the Employment and Career Services office.

The service learning program at LCCC officially began four years ago as a grassroots movement among faculty, students, staff and community partners. To date, nearly 20 LCCC instructors have incorporated service learning in 54 classes. The result has been more than 1,345 students clocking more than 17,000 hours of service.

With four key community partners – Save Our Children, Early College High School, Second Harvest Food Bank and the Lorain County Urban League – service learning offers LCCC students an abundance of opportunities to make a positive impact in Lorain County.

With a focus on the No Child Left Inside initiative, a national movement working to address childhood obesity and youth disconnect from nature, service learning students in Allied Health and Nursing courses have worked with Lorain County Urban League to teach low-income families about healthy eating habits. The LCUL outreach program Save Our Families works to reduce obesity and prevent diabetes among African American and Hispanic children and their families.

"We are fortunate to have the Service Learning Program at LCCC as a strategic partner," said Peter Ogbuji, director of programs and development for the Lorain County Urban League. "We are grateful for the opportunity to participate in No Child Left Inside, as it dovetails perfectly with Save Our Families."

Students in Ruby Beil’s ecology and environmental monitoring courses have completed numerous projects that further the LCCC’s master landscaping plan, including water quality studies to be used in the creation of a water garden. Beil’s students have also taken their service off-campus by building a butterfly garden at the Blessing House, a children’s crisis care facility in Lorain.

To incorporate reflection into the project, Beil’s students keep a journal throughout their service experience and use their entries to answer reflection questions at the end of the project.

"The hands-on experience is much more than what any classroom can teach you. With the understanding, experiences, and great new contacts, I feel my future is getting brighter each day," said Nanette Bennington, who first experienced service learning in Beil’s courses.

Instructors interested in incorporating service learning in their courses can tailor classes to fit one of three service learning designations: Service Learning Class, which requires every student in the class to participate; Service Learning Component Class, in which each student may choose to opt in to the service learning experience; or a Service Learning Course, in which every instructor teaching the course uses service learning as a teaching and learning strategy.

LCCC introduced a new service-learning course this summer, Service Learning I. Students in the one-credit-hour course will serve at least 15 hours with one of the program’s partners and complete a reflection project. Plans are underway for the creation of Service Learning II and Service Learning III courses.

Aimee Dickinson has used the Service Learning Component Class model for many of her Introduction to Sociology courses. Through a partnership with Reclaim Lorain County, Dickinson’s students were given the option of a research assignment, or working with the nonprofit organization and then sharing a reflection report with the class.

"Service learning has been a great way to get my students in to the community and let them see firsthand the impact they can have," Dickinson said.

For more information on service learning at LCCC, visit www.lorainccc.edu/servicelearning.

Featured Categories

  • Community

    More than 80 people – many of them farmers from Lorain County – participated in a town hall discussion and brainstorming session on the challenges and opportunities facing Lorain County’s agricultural economy recently at Lorain County Community College. The discussion followed the viewing of the documentary, “Forgotten Farms,” which examines the past and discusses a vision for […]

    Read the full article...
  • Economic Development

    Lorain County Community College has joined up with local clothing company Fresh Brewed Tees to bring its Cleveland-focused T-shirts to the college bookstore, Commodore Books & More. The specialty clothing focuses on Cleveland sports teams and celebrates the local community. Lorain native Tony Madalone, owner of Fresh Brewed Tees, said, “It’s exciting to partner with […]

    Read the full article...
  • Education

    There is still time to register for late-start spring semester classes at Lorain County Community College. Seats are available in courses that begin on Mondays, Feb. 19, March 19 and April 2. More than 200 sections of courses are offered in more than 40 subjects and many are offered online. Registration for short-term session is […]

    Read the full article...
  • Culture

    The Musical Theater Project presents “A Christmas Cabaret” at 8 p.m. on Friday, December 15 and at 2 p.m. on Saturday, December 16 at the Lorain County Community College’s Stocker Arts Center Cirigliano Studio Theatre. Before you can say “Sleigh ride,” Stocker Arts Center is back with its annual holiday treat! The show isn’t complete […]

    Read the full article...