20th Lego Olympiad Builds Lasting Memories and Interest in Engineering Technologies

{mosimage}Creativity can come in all sizes and shapes. Unless you were one of the nearly 500 contestants at the 20th Annual Lorain County Community College/Nordson Lego Olympiad. For them, creativity struck in a box of tiny rectangular blocks.

{mosimage}Creativity can come in all sizes and shapes. Unless you were one of the nearly 500 contestants at the 20th Annual Lorain County Community College/Nordson Lego Olympiad. For them, creativity struck in a box of tiny rectangular blocks.

Held April 16 at LCCC’s Spitzer Conference Center, the competition challenged students in grades K-12 to use their engineering skills to construct a unique project using only Legos. The event exposed students to the world of mechanisms, machinery, moving parts, design, teamwork, planning and construction techniques.

“These kids are building incredible projects out of Legos,” said Mike Substelny, an LCCC engineering and technology instructor and emcee of the olympiad. “They design and construct projects from their own imaginations and then are judged by real adult engineers.”

School groups from Lorain County and around Northeast Ohio came together to compete and build friendships on a shared love of Legos. Teams competed in theme challenges or created computer-controlled contraptions. An “Open Build” category allowed teams to create whatever they felt inspired to build.

One impressive creation was a drive-in theater, where the movie showing was called “Dino Attack.” The display included a variety of cars, a movie screen and a few other surprising details.

“We built a ticket booth with a moving gate and we built a dinosaur for appeal,” explained Marshall Monnette of Lorain. “It was actually pretty fun to make it.”

Other unique projects included a working catapult, a shooting range and a replica of the Titanic.

The Lego Olympiad is sponsored by LCCC’s student chapter of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and the Nordson Corp., with support from Best Buy.

20th Lego Olympiad Builds Lasting Memories and Interest in Engineering Technologies

{mosimage}Creativity can come in all sizes and shapes. Unless you were one of the nearly 500 contestants at the 20th Annual Lorain County Community College/Nordson Lego Olympiad. For them, creativity struck in a box of tiny rectangular blocks.

{mosimage}Creativity can come in all sizes and shapes. Unless you were one of the nearly 500 contestants at the 20th Annual Lorain County Community College/Nordson Lego Olympiad. For them, creativity struck in a box of tiny rectangular blocks.

Held April 16 at LCCC’s Spitzer Conference Center, the competition challenged students in grades K-12 to use their engineering skills to construct a unique project using only Legos. The event exposed students to the world of mechanisms, machinery, moving parts, design, teamwork, planning and construction techniques.

“These kids are building incredible projects out of Legos,” said Mike Substelny, an LCCC engineering and technology instructor and emcee of the olympiad. “They design and construct projects from their own imaginations and then are judged by real adult engineers.”

School groups from Lorain County and around Northeast Ohio came together to compete and build friendships on a shared love of Legos. Teams competed in theme challenges or created computer-controlled contraptions. An “Open Build” category allowed teams to create whatever they felt inspired to build.

One impressive creation was a drive-in theater, where the movie showing was called “Dino Attack.” The display included a variety of cars, a movie screen and a few other surprising details.

“We built a ticket booth with a moving gate and we built a dinosaur for appeal,” explained Marshall Monnette of Lorain. “It was actually pretty fun to make it.”

Other unique projects included a working catapult, a shooting range and a replica of the Titanic.

The Lego Olympiad is sponsored by LCCC’s student chapter of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and the Nordson Corp., with support from Best Buy.

20th Lego Olympiad Builds Lasting Memories and Interest in Engineering Technologies

{mosimage}Creativity can come in all sizes and shapes. Unless you were one of the nearly 500 contestants at the 20th Annual Lorain County Community College/Nordson Lego Olympiad. For them, creativity struck in a box of tiny rectangular blocks.

{mosimage}Creativity can come in all sizes and shapes. Unless you were one of the nearly 500 contestants at the 20th Annual Lorain County Community College/Nordson Lego Olympiad. For them, creativity struck in a box of tiny rectangular blocks.

Held April 16 at LCCC’s Spitzer Conference Center, the competition challenged students in grades K-12 to use their engineering skills to construct a unique project using only Legos. The event exposed students to the world of mechanisms, machinery, moving parts, design, teamwork, planning and construction techniques.

“These kids are building incredible projects out of Legos,” said Mike Substelny, an LCCC engineering and technology instructor and emcee of the olympiad. “They design and construct projects from their own imaginations and then are judged by real adult engineers.”

School groups from Lorain County and around Northeast Ohio came together to compete and build friendships on a shared love of Legos. Teams competed in theme challenges or created computer-controlled contraptions. An “Open Build” category allowed teams to create whatever they felt inspired to build.

One impressive creation was a drive-in theater, where the movie showing was called “Dino Attack.” The display included a variety of cars, a movie screen and a few other surprising details.

“We built a ticket booth with a moving gate and we built a dinosaur for appeal,” explained Marshall Monnette of Lorain. “It was actually pretty fun to make it.”

Other unique projects included a working catapult, a shooting range and a replica of the Titanic.

The Lego Olympiad is sponsored by LCCC’s student chapter of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and the Nordson Corp., with support from Best Buy.

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