College Graduates Largest Class in History

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College honored 1,458 graduates, 1,169 LCCC students and 289 University Partnership students – the largest class in its history – during its annual commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 23 in the LCCC Ewing Activities Center. 

This year 84 students received two degrees, seven received three degrees and two received four degrees for a total of 1,273 degrees awarded. 

Lorain County Community College honored 1,458 graduates – 1,169 LCCC students and 289 University Partnership students – the largest class in its history – during its annual commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 23 in the LCCC Ewing Activities Center. 

This year 84 students received two degrees, seven received three degrees and two received four degrees for a total of 1,273 degrees awarded.  The UP students were honored for earning bachelor’s and or master’s degrees from the eight universities in the LCCC University Partnership program.      

“Growth in our knowledge can never be taken away, it can always be increased and it is limitless. Commencement is not meant to be an endpoint, but the start of new growth that will be nurtured by the knowledge and experiences gathered during your education at LCCC,” Church said. “And LCCC is growing and changing too – to best serve the changing needs of our community and to position our community and residents for new opportunities for growth.”

{mosimage}One of those opportunities presented itself in 2007 when LCCC partnered with FirstEnergy to provide the electrical company’s Power Systems Institute in Lorain County to serve Lorain, Erie and Huron counties. In the two-year program students spend half the week at the college studying such subjects as technical writing, technical math, and principles of management, and the other half at Ohio Edison’s Elyria Line Shop learning the hands-on skills necessary for becoming electric utility workers. 

And this year 15 students in the first class of the First Energy Power Systems Institute will be receiving their associate of applied science degrees. FirstEnergy has offered them all jobs.

“The goal of this program is to take someone who has never been a lineman before and train them to become a lineman. How to climb, work on transformers, read voltmeters and hook services up to homes,” said Kenneth Glasgow, advanced distribution instructor for FirstEnergy.

“I really enjoyed the way this program was set up with time at FirstEnergy and at LCCC,” said Aaron Shock of Elyria. “It was great hands-on training and I always wanted to earn a degree.”

Jaren Thompson of Sullivan said he already has a bachelor’s degree but couldn’t find work because of the economy. When he heard about this program, which included free tuition, he jumped at the chance to get a foot in the door at a large employer. “Generation of electricity may change to solar or wind power, but now that I have this education it will be an easier transition to the new technology,” Thompson said.

“It’s nice to know I have a college degree now. It’s something I wanted to do after high school, but it didn’t work out,” said Don Miller of Grafton.  “It’s nice to know with a family that I’ll have a steady paycheck.”

Also this year the second class of Early College High School students graduated. This group of 28 students from Lorain and one from Elyria will earn both their high school diplomas and their associate’s of arts degrees. 

Early College High School is an opportunity for students entering the ninth grade to participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. They must be first-generation college students.

“I would never have had the opportunity if it wasn’t for Early College High School; it was hard work but it is worth every minute of it. This program is a learning experience and I would not be the person I am today without Early College,” said Alberto Gutierrez of Lorain.

Also graduating from LCCC with associate of arts degrees were 13 Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) students. The PSEO program allows high school students to earn college credits while in high school. In this program, students enroll in courses at LCCC and receive dual credit for high school requirements and college credit.

These students are: Colleen McIntosh of Avon Lake High School, Paul Srnis of Amherst Steele High School, Miranda Burbridge of Oberlin High School; Kyla DeFranco and Alexa Malusky of Columbia High School; Rachel Walbom of Firelands High School, Ashley Stromak and Kara Dill of Keystone High School; and Kristina Kobasher, Haley Loudin, Amber McClurg, Natalie Tegtman and Morgan Ziegler of Wellington High School.

Many said their LCCC education has helped them become better prepared to continue on with their education at other colleges and universities. They also liked the challenge of taking college courses while in high school.
“The PSEO program helped me understand what is expected in college as opposed to high school,” said Rachel Walbom of Firelands High School. “There are so many benefits that come from PSEO and it was a great experience.

To read stories about many LCCC Great Grads, visit www.lorainccc.edu/grads.

College Graduates Largest Class in History

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College honored 1,458 graduates, 1,169 LCCC students and 289 University Partnership students – the largest class in its history – during its annual commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 23 in the LCCC Ewing Activities Center. 

This year 84 students received two degrees, seven received three degrees and two received four degrees for a total of 1,273 degrees awarded. 

Lorain County Community College honored 1,458 graduates – 1,169 LCCC students and 289 University Partnership students – the largest class in its history – during its annual commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 23 in the LCCC Ewing Activities Center. 

This year 84 students received two degrees, seven received three degrees and two received four degrees for a total of 1,273 degrees awarded.  The UP students were honored for earning bachelor’s and or master’s degrees from the eight universities in the LCCC University Partnership program.      

“Growth in our knowledge can never be taken away, it can always be increased and it is limitless. Commencement is not meant to be an endpoint, but the start of new growth that will be nurtured by the knowledge and experiences gathered during your education at LCCC,” Church said. “And LCCC is growing and changing too – to best serve the changing needs of our community and to position our community and residents for new opportunities for growth.”

{mosimage}One of those opportunities presented itself in 2007 when LCCC partnered with FirstEnergy to provide the electrical company’s Power Systems Institute in Lorain County to serve Lorain, Erie and Huron counties. In the two-year program students spend half the week at the college studying such subjects as technical writing, technical math, and principles of management, and the other half at Ohio Edison’s Elyria Line Shop learning the hands-on skills necessary for becoming electric utility workers. 

And this year 15 students in the first class of the First Energy Power Systems Institute will be receiving their associate of applied science degrees. FirstEnergy has offered them all jobs.

“The goal of this program is to take someone who has never been a lineman before and train them to become a lineman. How to climb, work on transformers, read voltmeters and hook services up to homes,” said Kenneth Glasgow, advanced distribution instructor for FirstEnergy.

“I really enjoyed the way this program was set up with time at FirstEnergy and at LCCC,” said Aaron Shock of Elyria. “It was great hands-on training and I always wanted to earn a degree.”

Jaren Thompson of Sullivan said he already has a bachelor’s degree but couldn’t find work because of the economy. When he heard about this program, which included free tuition, he jumped at the chance to get a foot in the door at a large employer. “Generation of electricity may change to solar or wind power, but now that I have this education it will be an easier transition to the new technology,” Thompson said.

“It’s nice to know I have a college degree now. It’s something I wanted to do after high school, but it didn’t work out,” said Don Miller of Grafton.  “It’s nice to know with a family that I’ll have a steady paycheck.”

Also this year the second class of Early College High School students graduated. This group of 28 students from Lorain and one from Elyria will earn both their high school diplomas and their associate’s of arts degrees. 

Early College High School is an opportunity for students entering the ninth grade to participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. They must be first-generation college students.

“I would never have had the opportunity if it wasn’t for Early College High School; it was hard work but it is worth every minute of it. This program is a learning experience and I would not be the person I am today without Early College,” said Alberto Gutierrez of Lorain.

Also graduating from LCCC with associate of arts degrees were 13 Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) students. The PSEO program allows high school students to earn college credits while in high school. In this program, students enroll in courses at LCCC and receive dual credit for high school requirements and college credit.

These students are: Colleen McIntosh of Avon Lake High School, Paul Srnis of Amherst Steele High School, Miranda Burbridge of Oberlin High School; Kyla DeFranco and Alexa Malusky of Columbia High School; Rachel Walbom of Firelands High School, Ashley Stromak and Kara Dill of Keystone High School; and Kristina Kobasher, Haley Loudin, Amber McClurg, Natalie Tegtman and Morgan Ziegler of Wellington High School.

Many said their LCCC education has helped them become better prepared to continue on with their education at other colleges and universities. They also liked the challenge of taking college courses while in high school.
“The PSEO program helped me understand what is expected in college as opposed to high school,” said Rachel Walbom of Firelands High School. “There are so many benefits that come from PSEO and it was a great experience.

To read stories about many LCCC Great Grads, visit www.lorainccc.edu/grads.

College Graduates Largest Class in History

{mosimage}Lorain County Community College honored 1,458 graduates, 1,169 LCCC students and 289 University Partnership students – the largest class in its history – during its annual commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 23 in the LCCC Ewing Activities Center. 

This year 84 students received two degrees, seven received three degrees and two received four degrees for a total of 1,273 degrees awarded. 

Lorain County Community College honored 1,458 graduates – 1,169 LCCC students and 289 University Partnership students – the largest class in its history – during its annual commencement ceremony, Saturday, May 23 in the LCCC Ewing Activities Center. 

This year 84 students received two degrees, seven received three degrees and two received four degrees for a total of 1,273 degrees awarded.  The UP students were honored for earning bachelor’s and or master’s degrees from the eight universities in the LCCC University Partnership program.      

“Growth in our knowledge can never be taken away, it can always be increased and it is limitless. Commencement is not meant to be an endpoint, but the start of new growth that will be nurtured by the knowledge and experiences gathered during your education at LCCC,” Church said. “And LCCC is growing and changing too – to best serve the changing needs of our community and to position our community and residents for new opportunities for growth.”

{mosimage}One of those opportunities presented itself in 2007 when LCCC partnered with FirstEnergy to provide the electrical company’s Power Systems Institute in Lorain County to serve Lorain, Erie and Huron counties. In the two-year program students spend half the week at the college studying such subjects as technical writing, technical math, and principles of management, and the other half at Ohio Edison’s Elyria Line Shop learning the hands-on skills necessary for becoming electric utility workers. 

And this year 15 students in the first class of the First Energy Power Systems Institute will be receiving their associate of applied science degrees. FirstEnergy has offered them all jobs.

“The goal of this program is to take someone who has never been a lineman before and train them to become a lineman. How to climb, work on transformers, read voltmeters and hook services up to homes,” said Kenneth Glasgow, advanced distribution instructor for FirstEnergy.

“I really enjoyed the way this program was set up with time at FirstEnergy and at LCCC,” said Aaron Shock of Elyria. “It was great hands-on training and I always wanted to earn a degree.”

Jaren Thompson of Sullivan said he already has a bachelor’s degree but couldn’t find work because of the economy. When he heard about this program, which included free tuition, he jumped at the chance to get a foot in the door at a large employer. “Generation of electricity may change to solar or wind power, but now that I have this education it will be an easier transition to the new technology,” Thompson said.

“It’s nice to know I have a college degree now. It’s something I wanted to do after high school, but it didn’t work out,” said Don Miller of Grafton.  “It’s nice to know with a family that I’ll have a steady paycheck.”

Also this year the second class of Early College High School students graduated. This group of 28 students from Lorain and one from Elyria will earn both their high school diplomas and their associate’s of arts degrees. 

Early College High School is an opportunity for students entering the ninth grade to participate in a combined high school and college experience with the goal of earning a high school diploma and a college associate’s degree at the same time. They must be first-generation college students.

“I would never have had the opportunity if it wasn’t for Early College High School; it was hard work but it is worth every minute of it. This program is a learning experience and I would not be the person I am today without Early College,” said Alberto Gutierrez of Lorain.

Also graduating from LCCC with associate of arts degrees were 13 Post Secondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) students. The PSEO program allows high school students to earn college credits while in high school. In this program, students enroll in courses at LCCC and receive dual credit for high school requirements and college credit.

These students are: Colleen McIntosh of Avon Lake High School, Paul Srnis of Amherst Steele High School, Miranda Burbridge of Oberlin High School; Kyla DeFranco and Alexa Malusky of Columbia High School; Rachel Walbom of Firelands High School, Ashley Stromak and Kara Dill of Keystone High School; and Kristina Kobasher, Haley Loudin, Amber McClurg, Natalie Tegtman and Morgan Ziegler of Wellington High School.

Many said their LCCC education has helped them become better prepared to continue on with their education at other colleges and universities. They also liked the challenge of taking college courses while in high school.
“The PSEO program helped me understand what is expected in college as opposed to high school,” said Rachel Walbom of Firelands High School. “There are so many benefits that come from PSEO and it was a great experience.

To read stories about many LCCC Great Grads, visit www.lorainccc.edu/grads.

Featured Categories

  • Community

    The Wellington Center thrives as one of Lorain County Community College’s learning centers, offering residents of Southern Lorain County a chance to pursue higher education with the added convenience of being close to home. It’s the 10th year Wellington continues the LCCC tradition with a personal, smaller atmosphere that focuses on general education and business courses. […]

    Read the full article...
  • Economic Development

    Local employers need a skilled workforce, and those skills need to be acquired without students taking on massive college debt, according to a roundtable discussion on college affordability hosted by the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce. The discussion included Lorain County Community College President Dr. Marcia Ballinger; The Ohio State University President Dr. Michael Drake; […]

    Read the full article...
  • Education

    The field of cybersecurity is still evolving right along with technology, generating jobs at a much faster pace than the national average. In fact, information security jobs are projected to grow by 40 percent or more over the next decade, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Lorain County Community College has unveiled an […]

    Read the full article...
  • Culture

    Lorain County Community College’s Stocker Arts Center will present its first show of the season, “Guys with Guitars,” featuring Doug Wood, Darren Frate and Patrick Woods, as part of the revamped Studio Sessions series at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, August 25 and 26, in the Cirigliano Studio Theatre. The Studio Sessions series was […]

    Read the full article...