First LCCC Student Still Finds Education Important and Exciting

{mosimage}Betty J. Furlan’s shirt reads “LCCC Alumni, 1964-1966, 2.”  That gets a lot of reaction from students in her current classes.

Betty J. Furlan’s shirt reads “LCCC Alumni, 1964-1966, 2.”  That gets a lot of reaction from students in her current classes.

“The students love it. They’re very receptive to me being in the class with them. I’m usually the oldest student,” said the 61-year-old Avon resident.

Furlan loves it too from the interaction with younger students to the classes she continues to take. “I just find education important. I always tell my fellow students to never devalue education. It will always, always help you,” she said.

Back to her shirt. 

{mosimage}Furlan was the first student to register for classes when LCCC opened its doors in 1964, but because a test registration used the number one she was assigned the number two. “It’s just a lot of fun to wear that shirt around and see the reactions I get,” she said.

Furlan  (formerly Innes) graduated from North Ridgeville High School and really had no interest in going to college. Especially when her friends were out working and buying cars. “My mom was an education buff. She believed in education and felt I would need it,” she remembered.

So after two years she earned an associate’s degree in secretarial science with 14 other students in that program. “I was very proud to be in the first graduating class in 1966,” she added.

While the first classes she took at LCCC were held at an elementary school in Elyria (the LCCC campus didn’t open until 1966) and other off-site facilities some of her best memories come from meeting people from different communities in Lorain County.

“I got to meet kids from all over the area who were from different backgrounds and cultures. That in itself was an education for me,” she said.

The education, training and personal growth she underwent as a young student at LCCC paid off. With her secretarial skills like shorthand and typing honed and her background enriched with additional liberal arts courses she landed a job a Ford’s Brookpark plant.

“I was trained very well. My teachers were all top-notch,” Furlan said. “I walked into Ford at 19 for an interview and I got a job as a secretary in the controller’s office.”

She met her husband Jerry Furlan at Ford (they’ve been married 36 years) and the couple has two children, Dean and Carrie. The family lived in North Olmsted to be close to their workplace.

Furlan left Ford after 10 years to start a family. When her children were old enough she continued in the workforce spending 10 years at American Greetings and then 10 years at the Eaton Corporation.

But education continued to be a part of her life. “Computers were just starting to come into the business world so I took courses at Tri-C in computers and word processing to keep my skills current,” she said. Graphic design also piqued her interest so she started taking courses in that area as well.

When Betty and Jerry retired and moved back to Lorain County in 2006 she came back to LCCC and is currently taking courses in digital photography.

“I plan to keep going. I love to learn,” she said. “When I was 17 I felt like I knew 90 percent of everything. Now I feel like I only know five percent of everything. I have a lot to learn!” 

 

Re-connect With Your Former LCCC Classmates

Betty (Innes) Furlan would like to hear from any former classmates who are still in the area. “I’d like to re-connect with my old classmates and reminisce. But I’m also amazed at how LCCC has grown and if they haven’t seen the campus in a while, they’ll be surprised,” she said.

The LCCC Alumni Association would like to hear from any of those graduates from the first class as well as any others – number 3 through 299,999 – who have attended LCCC. Remember, you are considered an alum even if you just attended LCCC or the University Partnership but did not graduate.

Here is how you can connect. Complete the Alumni Association Registration form at www.lorainccc.edu/alumni or call the LCCC Foundation office at  (440) 366-4039.

First LCCC Student Still Finds Education Important and Exciting

{mosimage}Betty J. Furlan’s shirt reads “LCCC Alumni, 1964-1966, 2.”  That gets a lot of reaction from students in her current classes.

Betty J. Furlan’s shirt reads “LCCC Alumni, 1964-1966, 2.”  That gets a lot of reaction from students in her current classes.

“The students love it. They’re very receptive to me being in the class with them. I’m usually the oldest student,” said the 61-year-old Avon resident.

Furlan loves it too from the interaction with younger students to the classes she continues to take. “I just find education important. I always tell my fellow students to never devalue education. It will always, always help you,” she said.

Back to her shirt. 

{mosimage}Furlan was the first student to register for classes when LCCC opened its doors in 1964, but because a test registration used the number one she was assigned the number two. “It’s just a lot of fun to wear that shirt around and see the reactions I get,” she said.

Furlan  (formerly Innes) graduated from North Ridgeville High School and really had no interest in going to college. Especially when her friends were out working and buying cars. “My mom was an education buff. She believed in education and felt I would need it,” she remembered.

So after two years she earned an associate’s degree in secretarial science with 14 other students in that program. “I was very proud to be in the first graduating class in 1966,” she added.

While the first classes she took at LCCC were held at an elementary school in Elyria (the LCCC campus didn’t open until 1966) and other off-site facilities some of her best memories come from meeting people from different communities in Lorain County.

“I got to meet kids from all over the area who were from different backgrounds and cultures. That in itself was an education for me,” she said.

The education, training and personal growth she underwent as a young student at LCCC paid off. With her secretarial skills like shorthand and typing honed and her background enriched with additional liberal arts courses she landed a job a Ford’s Brookpark plant.

“I was trained very well. My teachers were all top-notch,” Furlan said. “I walked into Ford at 19 for an interview and I got a job as a secretary in the controller’s office.”

She met her husband Jerry Furlan at Ford (they’ve been married 36 years) and the couple has two children, Dean and Carrie. The family lived in North Olmsted to be close to their workplace.

Furlan left Ford after 10 years to start a family. When her children were old enough she continued in the workforce spending 10 years at American Greetings and then 10 years at the Eaton Corporation.

But education continued to be a part of her life. “Computers were just starting to come into the business world so I took courses at Tri-C in computers and word processing to keep my skills current,” she said. Graphic design also piqued her interest so she started taking courses in that area as well.

When Betty and Jerry retired and moved back to Lorain County in 2006 she came back to LCCC and is currently taking courses in digital photography.

“I plan to keep going. I love to learn,” she said. “When I was 17 I felt like I knew 90 percent of everything. Now I feel like I only know five percent of everything. I have a lot to learn!” 

 

Re-connect With Your Former LCCC Classmates

Betty (Innes) Furlan would like to hear from any former classmates who are still in the area. “I’d like to re-connect with my old classmates and reminisce. But I’m also amazed at how LCCC has grown and if they haven’t seen the campus in a while, they’ll be surprised,” she said.

The LCCC Alumni Association would like to hear from any of those graduates from the first class as well as any others – number 3 through 299,999 – who have attended LCCC. Remember, you are considered an alum even if you just attended LCCC or the University Partnership but did not graduate.

Here is how you can connect. Complete the Alumni Association Registration form at www.lorainccc.edu/alumni or call the LCCC Foundation office at  (440) 366-4039.

First LCCC Student Still Finds Education Important and Exciting

{mosimage}Betty J. Furlan’s shirt reads “LCCC Alumni, 1964-1966, 2.”  That gets a lot of reaction from students in her current classes.

Betty J. Furlan’s shirt reads “LCCC Alumni, 1964-1966, 2.”  That gets a lot of reaction from students in her current classes.

“The students love it. They’re very receptive to me being in the class with them. I’m usually the oldest student,” said the 61-year-old Avon resident.

Furlan loves it too from the interaction with younger students to the classes she continues to take. “I just find education important. I always tell my fellow students to never devalue education. It will always, always help you,” she said.

Back to her shirt. 

{mosimage}Furlan was the first student to register for classes when LCCC opened its doors in 1964, but because a test registration used the number one she was assigned the number two. “It’s just a lot of fun to wear that shirt around and see the reactions I get,” she said.

Furlan  (formerly Innes) graduated from North Ridgeville High School and really had no interest in going to college. Especially when her friends were out working and buying cars. “My mom was an education buff. She believed in education and felt I would need it,” she remembered.

So after two years she earned an associate’s degree in secretarial science with 14 other students in that program. “I was very proud to be in the first graduating class in 1966,” she added.

While the first classes she took at LCCC were held at an elementary school in Elyria (the LCCC campus didn’t open until 1966) and other off-site facilities some of her best memories come from meeting people from different communities in Lorain County.

“I got to meet kids from all over the area who were from different backgrounds and cultures. That in itself was an education for me,” she said.

The education, training and personal growth she underwent as a young student at LCCC paid off. With her secretarial skills like shorthand and typing honed and her background enriched with additional liberal arts courses she landed a job a Ford’s Brookpark plant.

“I was trained very well. My teachers were all top-notch,” Furlan said. “I walked into Ford at 19 for an interview and I got a job as a secretary in the controller’s office.”

She met her husband Jerry Furlan at Ford (they’ve been married 36 years) and the couple has two children, Dean and Carrie. The family lived in North Olmsted to be close to their workplace.

Furlan left Ford after 10 years to start a family. When her children were old enough she continued in the workforce spending 10 years at American Greetings and then 10 years at the Eaton Corporation.

But education continued to be a part of her life. “Computers were just starting to come into the business world so I took courses at Tri-C in computers and word processing to keep my skills current,” she said. Graphic design also piqued her interest so she started taking courses in that area as well.

When Betty and Jerry retired and moved back to Lorain County in 2006 she came back to LCCC and is currently taking courses in digital photography.

“I plan to keep going. I love to learn,” she said. “When I was 17 I felt like I knew 90 percent of everything. Now I feel like I only know five percent of everything. I have a lot to learn!” 

 

Re-connect With Your Former LCCC Classmates

Betty (Innes) Furlan would like to hear from any former classmates who are still in the area. “I’d like to re-connect with my old classmates and reminisce. But I’m also amazed at how LCCC has grown and if they haven’t seen the campus in a while, they’ll be surprised,” she said.

The LCCC Alumni Association would like to hear from any of those graduates from the first class as well as any others – number 3 through 299,999 – who have attended LCCC. Remember, you are considered an alum even if you just attended LCCC or the University Partnership but did not graduate.

Here is how you can connect. Complete the Alumni Association Registration form at www.lorainccc.edu/alumni or call the LCCC Foundation office at  (440) 366-4039.

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