Community Colleges to Play Critical Role in State’s Higher Education Plan

{mosimage}Community colleges will play a critical role in meeting Governor Ted Strickland’s goal of raising the overall educational attainment level of the residents of Ohio, according to the recently released “Strategic Plan for Higher Education.”

The plan, submitted by Eric D. Fingerhut, Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents to the Ohio General Assembly, said “Providing a comprehensive community college education to every Ohioan is a cornerstone of this plan.” This is important the plan goes on to say, “Because community colleges have come to fill so many roles in our system of higher education.”

Community colleges will play a critical role in meeting Governor Ted Strickland’s goal of raising the overall educational attainment level of the residents of Ohio, according to the recently released “Strategic Plan for Higher Education.”

The plan, submitted by Eric D. Fingerhut, Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents to the Ohio General Assembly, said “Providing a comprehensive community college education to every Ohioan is a cornerstone of this plan.” This is important the plan goes on to say, “Because community colleges have come to fill so many roles in our system of higher education.”

{mosimage}The 10-year strategic plan for higher education details strategies to meet the governor’s goal of enrolling 230,000 more students while keeping more graduates in Ohio and attracting more talent to the state. One goal of the plan is to mobilize all of Ohio’s public colleges and universities under the University System of Ohio.

"On a practical level, we know that the vast majority of the new students who will enter the University System of Ohio….will come in through the community colleges," the report said.

“We applaud this plan as it sends a strong signal that in today’s Knowledge Economy a two-year degree is needed for 75 percent of the new jobs being created,” said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church.

LCCC has aligned its enrollment goals with those of the state by providing expanded access for the community, Church noted, by developing more collaborations with universities and adult career centers.  Under the plan adult career centers and literacy programs will be brought under University System of Ohio by January of 2009.

“This will allow the state to build a fully integrated adult education system,” the plant states.

The plan also calls for the establishment of the “Seniors to Sophomores” program. This program is an early college credit program that will bring qualified high school seniors to college campuses, allowing them to earn a full year of academic credit for free.

“We know that by providing greater pathways between high schools and community colleges and universities will benefit our residents,” Church said.

"This 10-year plan for Ohio’s institutions of higher education will ensure not only that we dramatically expand educational opportunities for Ohioans but that we do so in a way that makes our state a world-class economic competitor," Fingerhut said.

The plan will provide Ohioans with access to a high-quality education with a low-cost tuition by: 

  • Creating distinctive missions for each university leading to the establishment of Centers of Excellence that will drive the economy.
  • Offering many educational options to students who can then choose the best programs at the best price to meet their needs.
  • Offering associate and bachelor’s programs in core fields available at a University System of Ohio campus within 30 miles of every Ohioan.
  • Allowing "Dual Admission" for students entering a community college with the intention of continuing on to a University System of Ohio university.
  • Re-framing the relationship between business and higher education to create new jobs and a highly skilled workforce.
  • Encouraging high school students to earn college credit through "Seniors to Sophomores" and other early college credit programs.          

 

The University System of Ohio, created through a directive of Governor Strickland, consists of 13 public universities, one medical college, 24 regional branch campuses, 23 community colleges, as well as adult literacy and adult workforce centers. In creating the University System of Ohio, the governor recognized that the primary way to make Ohio’s economy more competitive is by raising the aspirations and the educational levels of its citizens.

To view the full report, visit www.universitysystem.ohio.gov.

 

Community Colleges to Play Critical Role in State’s Higher Education Plan

{mosimage}Community colleges will play a critical role in meeting Governor Ted Strickland’s goal of raising the overall educational attainment level of the residents of Ohio, according to the recently released “Strategic Plan for Higher Education.”

The plan, submitted by Eric D. Fingerhut, Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents to the Ohio General Assembly, said “Providing a comprehensive community college education to every Ohioan is a cornerstone of this plan.” This is important the plan goes on to say, “Because community colleges have come to fill so many roles in our system of higher education.”

Community colleges will play a critical role in meeting Governor Ted Strickland’s goal of raising the overall educational attainment level of the residents of Ohio, according to the recently released “Strategic Plan for Higher Education.”

The plan, submitted by Eric D. Fingerhut, Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents to the Ohio General Assembly, said “Providing a comprehensive community college education to every Ohioan is a cornerstone of this plan.” This is important the plan goes on to say, “Because community colleges have come to fill so many roles in our system of higher education.”

{mosimage}The 10-year strategic plan for higher education details strategies to meet the governor’s goal of enrolling 230,000 more students while keeping more graduates in Ohio and attracting more talent to the state. One goal of the plan is to mobilize all of Ohio’s public colleges and universities under the University System of Ohio.

"On a practical level, we know that the vast majority of the new students who will enter the University System of Ohio….will come in through the community colleges," the report said.

“We applaud this plan as it sends a strong signal that in today’s Knowledge Economy a two-year degree is needed for 75 percent of the new jobs being created,” said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church.

LCCC has aligned its enrollment goals with those of the state by providing expanded access for the community, Church noted, by developing more collaborations with universities and adult career centers.  Under the plan adult career centers and literacy programs will be brought under University System of Ohio by January of 2009.

“This will allow the state to build a fully integrated adult education system,” the plant states.

The plan also calls for the establishment of the “Seniors to Sophomores” program. This program is an early college credit program that will bring qualified high school seniors to college campuses, allowing them to earn a full year of academic credit for free.

“We know that by providing greater pathways between high schools and community colleges and universities will benefit our residents,” Church said.

"This 10-year plan for Ohio’s institutions of higher education will ensure not only that we dramatically expand educational opportunities for Ohioans but that we do so in a way that makes our state a world-class economic competitor," Fingerhut said.

The plan will provide Ohioans with access to a high-quality education with a low-cost tuition by: 

  • Creating distinctive missions for each university leading to the establishment of Centers of Excellence that will drive the economy.
  • Offering many educational options to students who can then choose the best programs at the best price to meet their needs.
  • Offering associate and bachelor’s programs in core fields available at a University System of Ohio campus within 30 miles of every Ohioan.
  • Allowing "Dual Admission" for students entering a community college with the intention of continuing on to a University System of Ohio university.
  • Re-framing the relationship between business and higher education to create new jobs and a highly skilled workforce.
  • Encouraging high school students to earn college credit through "Seniors to Sophomores" and other early college credit programs.          

 

The University System of Ohio, created through a directive of Governor Strickland, consists of 13 public universities, one medical college, 24 regional branch campuses, 23 community colleges, as well as adult literacy and adult workforce centers. In creating the University System of Ohio, the governor recognized that the primary way to make Ohio’s economy more competitive is by raising the aspirations and the educational levels of its citizens.

To view the full report, visit www.universitysystem.ohio.gov.

 

Community Colleges to Play Critical Role in State’s Higher Education Plan

{mosimage}Community colleges will play a critical role in meeting Governor Ted Strickland’s goal of raising the overall educational attainment level of the residents of Ohio, according to the recently released “Strategic Plan for Higher Education.”

The plan, submitted by Eric D. Fingerhut, Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents to the Ohio General Assembly, said “Providing a comprehensive community college education to every Ohioan is a cornerstone of this plan.” This is important the plan goes on to say, “Because community colleges have come to fill so many roles in our system of higher education.”

Community colleges will play a critical role in meeting Governor Ted Strickland’s goal of raising the overall educational attainment level of the residents of Ohio, according to the recently released “Strategic Plan for Higher Education.”

The plan, submitted by Eric D. Fingerhut, Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents to the Ohio General Assembly, said “Providing a comprehensive community college education to every Ohioan is a cornerstone of this plan.” This is important the plan goes on to say, “Because community colleges have come to fill so many roles in our system of higher education.”

{mosimage}The 10-year strategic plan for higher education details strategies to meet the governor’s goal of enrolling 230,000 more students while keeping more graduates in Ohio and attracting more talent to the state. One goal of the plan is to mobilize all of Ohio’s public colleges and universities under the University System of Ohio.

"On a practical level, we know that the vast majority of the new students who will enter the University System of Ohio….will come in through the community colleges," the report said.

“We applaud this plan as it sends a strong signal that in today’s Knowledge Economy a two-year degree is needed for 75 percent of the new jobs being created,” said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church.

LCCC has aligned its enrollment goals with those of the state by providing expanded access for the community, Church noted, by developing more collaborations with universities and adult career centers.  Under the plan adult career centers and literacy programs will be brought under University System of Ohio by January of 2009.

“This will allow the state to build a fully integrated adult education system,” the plant states.

The plan also calls for the establishment of the “Seniors to Sophomores” program. This program is an early college credit program that will bring qualified high school seniors to college campuses, allowing them to earn a full year of academic credit for free.

“We know that by providing greater pathways between high schools and community colleges and universities will benefit our residents,” Church said.

"This 10-year plan for Ohio’s institutions of higher education will ensure not only that we dramatically expand educational opportunities for Ohioans but that we do so in a way that makes our state a world-class economic competitor," Fingerhut said.

The plan will provide Ohioans with access to a high-quality education with a low-cost tuition by: 

  • Creating distinctive missions for each university leading to the establishment of Centers of Excellence that will drive the economy.
  • Offering many educational options to students who can then choose the best programs at the best price to meet their needs.
  • Offering associate and bachelor’s programs in core fields available at a University System of Ohio campus within 30 miles of every Ohioan.
  • Allowing "Dual Admission" for students entering a community college with the intention of continuing on to a University System of Ohio university.
  • Re-framing the relationship between business and higher education to create new jobs and a highly skilled workforce.
  • Encouraging high school students to earn college credit through "Seniors to Sophomores" and other early college credit programs.          

 

The University System of Ohio, created through a directive of Governor Strickland, consists of 13 public universities, one medical college, 24 regional branch campuses, 23 community colleges, as well as adult literacy and adult workforce centers. In creating the University System of Ohio, the governor recognized that the primary way to make Ohio’s economy more competitive is by raising the aspirations and the educational levels of its citizens.

To view the full report, visit www.universitysystem.ohio.gov.

 

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