LCCC’s New Entrepreneurship Innovation Center to Spur Regional Economic Development

{mosimage}

The economic transformation of Lorain County and the region will be driven by education, innovation and entrepreneurship, and Lorain County Community College’s new Entrepreneurship Innovation Center will help spur that transformation.


The goal of the center is to stimulate and nurture good ideas, help them grow into viable businesses and then sustain them to provide good jobs and increase the quality of life in our community,” said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church.

The Entrepreneurship Innovation Center opened recently to accolades from local, state and federal officials who helped LCCC dedicate the new facility. More than 500 community, regional and education leaders and entrepreneurs attended the dedication of the 45,000 square foot, three-story, state-of-the-art Center that will serve as a resource for businesses and entrepreneurs.

{mosimage}The dedication was highlighted by comments from Senator Sherrod Brown, Governor Ted Strickland, Lt. Governor Lee Fisher, Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, Congresswoman Betty Sutton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor Mason Bishop; University of Akron President Luis Proenza, Lorain County Commissioner Ted Kalo, and Lorain County Administrator Jim Cordes.

Citing Ohio’s long history of invention and entrepreneurship, Brown said, “There is no better place than in Lorain County, no better place in the state or in the country where we have seen educational institutions, businesses and government come together to stimulate entrepreneurial activity.”

Strickland said the hope for Ohio is in education. “In order for Ohio to reach its full potential we must educate its young people and we must create opportunities for those who are willing to innovate and take the risks of entrepreneurship.”

Ohio’s people are characterized by a history of risk-taking, inventiveness and entrepreneurship, Strickland noted. “That DNA of the Ohio person will lead Ohio to a better, more prosperous future.” Strickland said.

He also urged guests not to be afraid to change the way they think. “Learning is all about changing the way we think. This new center will challenge people to change the way they think – to think new ideas, to take new risks and to create new and better jobs for the people of our region,” Strickland said.

{mosimage}Mason Bishop, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor, said the new center is a national example of how a “community college can serve as a hub for regional economic development and global competitiveness.”

The Center offers the latest in technology communications and systems, including video conferencing, multi-media presentation equipment, flexible meeting and training space and computer labs. It is located in the Great Lakes Technology Park on the southern end of the LCCC campus.

The focus is on creating jobs in Ohio’s areas of new opportunities; investing in Ohio’s best asset, people, through demand driven workforce development; and supporting emerging innovators and entrepreneurs. The center is home to the Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise (GLIDE), an Edison Technology incubator, as well as LCCC’s Entrepreneurship Innovation Institute.

The dedication was more than the opening of a building, Church noted.
“It is the recognition of this community’s commitment to transforming our economy and workforce to remain competitive in today’s global economy. It is a recognition that entrepreneurial spirit of our region led our extraordinary success in the post WWII manufacturing based economy and it is the renewal of that spirit which promises to create the tipping point of the economic vitality to come,” said Church. “It is a celebration of the growth transpiring throughout the greater Lorain County region as innovative ideas bubble up to create new businesses in high-growth industries and generate promising job opportunities for residents.”

{mosimage}“Where once we optimized our industries and organizations around quality and efficiency, today we must optimize our entire society around innovation,” said University of Akron President Luis Proenza. LCCC and Akron have developed the Innovation Alliance, a collaborative effort between the two institutions to align strengths and resources of both, accelerate educational efficiencies and spur economic development in an area between the two campuses called the Innovation Corridor.

Ohio Lt. Governor Lee Fisher, who is also Director of Development for the state, called the Center a big idea. “The main drivers of Ohio’s economy are three: knowledge, talent and innovation. They all intersect at the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center,” Fisher said.
Collaborative efforts like the Center help Ohio stay ahead of changes in the economy, he added. “Let me be clear. Staying up with the curve is as good as being behind it,” Fisher said. “We always have to be ahead of the curve… there’s an old saying that says the best way to predict the future is to create it. That’s what we’re doing here.”

The Entrepreneurship Innovation Center also has the distinction of being the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Certified facility in Lorain County. Building design and placement provides lowest impact to existing wetlands and includes natural landscaping with native Ohio and naturalized species, including blueberry bushes. Building materials and systems conserve the earth’s natural resources. As a green building, only environmentally friendly cleaning products will be used.

{mosimage}The LEED Green Building Rating System™ is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED gives building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings’ performance. LEED promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection, and indoor environmental quality.

“I am always looking for ways to spur innovation in our area, create new jobs to complement those we already have, and bring new economic growth,” said Congresswoman Betty Sutton. “I am proud to support the LCCC Entrepreneurship Innovation Center because it will help us achieve these goals. This important partnership between local government, businesses, and civic organizations will be a critical resource for the new generation of innovators and small businesses that will revitalize our region.”

{mosimage}The first floor of the facility is home to Entrepreneur’s Corner presented by the Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE) in association with the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce, Lorain County Growth Partnership, North Coast Regional Chamber of Commerce, West Shore Entrepreneur’s Club, and the Entrepreneur’s Edge. This resource provides home-based business owners and traveling entrepreneurs a location to get work done on the run. Meeting rooms for 5 to 75 are fully equipped with videoconferencing, teleconferencing, multimedia stations and flexible configurations.
Also, located on the first floor are LCCC’s Entrepreneurship Innovation Institute, connecting entrepreneurs and business owners with the breadth of resources available through Lorain County Community College that can help take their idea and business to new heights.

The second floor is home to GLIDE (Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise) and inside the GLIDE office space will be the Women’s Development Center as well as satellite space for the Small Business Development Center of Lorain County. GLIDE is an Edison Technology Incubator, the only one of 11 statewide that is located on a college campus. GLIDE is a partnership between the Lorain County Commissioners, the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce and LCCC.

The remaining second and third floors provide customizable space for businesses in a creative, stimulating environment, with direct access to a network of college and community resources designed to help them grow. Several companies have taken residence inside of the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center.

“Those communities that thrive in this 21st century will be those that link new technology and innovation to quality of life and sustainability. They will build upon their natural endowments,” said Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur.

State and federal awards and grants covered approximately 50 percent of the $8 million construction costs for the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center, while the remaining facility costs will be covered through lease payments paid by companies locating on the second and third floors of the building.

Some of these companies include Sooy + Co., a leading design and marketing communications agency; Clear Image Technologies, a developer of image enhancement systems and intelligent software platforms; and Banyan Technology, a technology development company that provides software solutions that increase efficiencies and effectiveness of transactional information management.


For more information on locating your business in the EIC or other business services available in the EIC, call 1-800-995-5222 (extension 4310).

LCCC’s New Entrepreneurship Innovation Center to Spur Regional Economic Development

{mosimage}

The economic transformation of Lorain County and the region will be driven by education, innovation and entrepreneurship, and Lorain County Community College’s new Entrepreneurship Innovation Center will help spur that transformation.


The goal of the center is to stimulate and nurture good ideas, help them grow into viable businesses and then sustain them to provide good jobs and increase the quality of life in our community,” said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church.

The Entrepreneurship Innovation Center opened recently to accolades from local, state and federal officials who helped LCCC dedicate the new facility. More than 500 community, regional and education leaders and entrepreneurs attended the dedication of the 45,000 square foot, three-story, state-of-the-art Center that will serve as a resource for businesses and entrepreneurs.

{mosimage}The dedication was highlighted by comments from Senator Sherrod Brown, Governor Ted Strickland, Lt. Governor Lee Fisher, Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, Congresswoman Betty Sutton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor Mason Bishop; University of Akron President Luis Proenza, Lorain County Commissioner Ted Kalo, and Lorain County Administrator Jim Cordes.

Citing Ohio’s long history of invention and entrepreneurship, Brown said, “There is no better place than in Lorain County, no better place in the state or in the country where we have seen educational institutions, businesses and government come together to stimulate entrepreneurial activity.”

Strickland said the hope for Ohio is in education. “In order for Ohio to reach its full potential we must educate its young people and we must create opportunities for those who are willing to innovate and take the risks of entrepreneurship.”

Ohio’s people are characterized by a history of risk-taking, inventiveness and entrepreneurship, Strickland noted. “That DNA of the Ohio person will lead Ohio to a better, more prosperous future.” Strickland said.

He also urged guests not to be afraid to change the way they think. “Learning is all about changing the way we think. This new center will challenge people to change the way they think – to think new ideas, to take new risks and to create new and better jobs for the people of our region,” Strickland said.

{mosimage}Mason Bishop, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor, said the new center is a national example of how a “community college can serve as a hub for regional economic development and global competitiveness.”

The Center offers the latest in technology communications and systems, including video conferencing, multi-media presentation equipment, flexible meeting and training space and computer labs. It is located in the Great Lakes Technology Park on the southern end of the LCCC campus.

The focus is on creating jobs in Ohio’s areas of new opportunities; investing in Ohio’s best asset, people, through demand driven workforce development; and supporting emerging innovators and entrepreneurs. The center is home to the Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise (GLIDE), an Edison Technology incubator, as well as LCCC’s Entrepreneurship Innovation Institute.

The dedication was more than the opening of a building, Church noted.
“It is the recognition of this community’s commitment to transforming our economy and workforce to remain competitive in today’s global economy. It is a recognition that entrepreneurial spirit of our region led our extraordinary success in the post WWII manufacturing based economy and it is the renewal of that spirit which promises to create the tipping point of the economic vitality to come,” said Church. “It is a celebration of the growth transpiring throughout the greater Lorain County region as innovative ideas bubble up to create new businesses in high-growth industries and generate promising job opportunities for residents.”

{mosimage}“Where once we optimized our industries and organizations around quality and efficiency, today we must optimize our entire society around innovation,” said University of Akron President Luis Proenza. LCCC and Akron have developed the Innovation Alliance, a collaborative effort between the two institutions to align strengths and resources of both, accelerate educational efficiencies and spur economic development in an area between the two campuses called the Innovation Corridor.

Ohio Lt. Governor Lee Fisher, who is also Director of Development for the state, called the Center a big idea. “The main drivers of Ohio’s economy are three: knowledge, talent and innovation. They all intersect at the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center,” Fisher said.
Collaborative efforts like the Center help Ohio stay ahead of changes in the economy, he added. “Let me be clear. Staying up with the curve is as good as being behind it,” Fisher said. “We always have to be ahead of the curve… there’s an old saying that says the best way to predict the future is to create it. That’s what we’re doing here.”

The Entrepreneurship Innovation Center also has the distinction of being the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Certified facility in Lorain County. Building design and placement provides lowest impact to existing wetlands and includes natural landscaping with native Ohio and naturalized species, including blueberry bushes. Building materials and systems conserve the earth’s natural resources. As a green building, only environmentally friendly cleaning products will be used.

{mosimage}The LEED Green Building Rating System™ is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED gives building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings’ performance. LEED promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection, and indoor environmental quality.

“I am always looking for ways to spur innovation in our area, create new jobs to complement those we already have, and bring new economic growth,” said Congresswoman Betty Sutton. “I am proud to support the LCCC Entrepreneurship Innovation Center because it will help us achieve these goals. This important partnership between local government, businesses, and civic organizations will be a critical resource for the new generation of innovators and small businesses that will revitalize our region.”

{mosimage}The first floor of the facility is home to Entrepreneur’s Corner presented by the Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE) in association with the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce, Lorain County Growth Partnership, North Coast Regional Chamber of Commerce, West Shore Entrepreneur’s Club, and the Entrepreneur’s Edge. This resource provides home-based business owners and traveling entrepreneurs a location to get work done on the run. Meeting rooms for 5 to 75 are fully equipped with videoconferencing, teleconferencing, multimedia stations and flexible configurations.
Also, located on the first floor are LCCC’s Entrepreneurship Innovation Institute, connecting entrepreneurs and business owners with the breadth of resources available through Lorain County Community College that can help take their idea and business to new heights.

The second floor is home to GLIDE (Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise) and inside the GLIDE office space will be the Women’s Development Center as well as satellite space for the Small Business Development Center of Lorain County. GLIDE is an Edison Technology Incubator, the only one of 11 statewide that is located on a college campus. GLIDE is a partnership between the Lorain County Commissioners, the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce and LCCC.

The remaining second and third floors provide customizable space for businesses in a creative, stimulating environment, with direct access to a network of college and community resources designed to help them grow. Several companies have taken residence inside of the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center.

“Those communities that thrive in this 21st century will be those that link new technology and innovation to quality of life and sustainability. They will build upon their natural endowments,” said Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur.

State and federal awards and grants covered approximately 50 percent of the $8 million construction costs for the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center, while the remaining facility costs will be covered through lease payments paid by companies locating on the second and third floors of the building.

Some of these companies include Sooy + Co., a leading design and marketing communications agency; Clear Image Technologies, a developer of image enhancement systems and intelligent software platforms; and Banyan Technology, a technology development company that provides software solutions that increase efficiencies and effectiveness of transactional information management.


For more information on locating your business in the EIC or other business services available in the EIC, call 1-800-995-5222 (extension 4310).

LCCC’s New Entrepreneurship Innovation Center to Spur Regional Economic Development

{mosimage}

The economic transformation of Lorain County and the region will be driven by education, innovation and entrepreneurship, and Lorain County Community College’s new Entrepreneurship Innovation Center will help spur that transformation.


The goal of the center is to stimulate and nurture good ideas, help them grow into viable businesses and then sustain them to provide good jobs and increase the quality of life in our community,” said LCCC President Dr. Roy A. Church.

The Entrepreneurship Innovation Center opened recently to accolades from local, state and federal officials who helped LCCC dedicate the new facility. More than 500 community, regional and education leaders and entrepreneurs attended the dedication of the 45,000 square foot, three-story, state-of-the-art Center that will serve as a resource for businesses and entrepreneurs.

{mosimage}The dedication was highlighted by comments from Senator Sherrod Brown, Governor Ted Strickland, Lt. Governor Lee Fisher, Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, Congresswoman Betty Sutton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor Mason Bishop; University of Akron President Luis Proenza, Lorain County Commissioner Ted Kalo, and Lorain County Administrator Jim Cordes.

Citing Ohio’s long history of invention and entrepreneurship, Brown said, “There is no better place than in Lorain County, no better place in the state or in the country where we have seen educational institutions, businesses and government come together to stimulate entrepreneurial activity.”

Strickland said the hope for Ohio is in education. “In order for Ohio to reach its full potential we must educate its young people and we must create opportunities for those who are willing to innovate and take the risks of entrepreneurship.”

Ohio’s people are characterized by a history of risk-taking, inventiveness and entrepreneurship, Strickland noted. “That DNA of the Ohio person will lead Ohio to a better, more prosperous future.” Strickland said.

He also urged guests not to be afraid to change the way they think. “Learning is all about changing the way we think. This new center will challenge people to change the way they think – to think new ideas, to take new risks and to create new and better jobs for the people of our region,” Strickland said.

{mosimage}Mason Bishop, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor, said the new center is a national example of how a “community college can serve as a hub for regional economic development and global competitiveness.”

The Center offers the latest in technology communications and systems, including video conferencing, multi-media presentation equipment, flexible meeting and training space and computer labs. It is located in the Great Lakes Technology Park on the southern end of the LCCC campus.

The focus is on creating jobs in Ohio’s areas of new opportunities; investing in Ohio’s best asset, people, through demand driven workforce development; and supporting emerging innovators and entrepreneurs. The center is home to the Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise (GLIDE), an Edison Technology incubator, as well as LCCC’s Entrepreneurship Innovation Institute.

The dedication was more than the opening of a building, Church noted.
“It is the recognition of this community’s commitment to transforming our economy and workforce to remain competitive in today’s global economy. It is a recognition that entrepreneurial spirit of our region led our extraordinary success in the post WWII manufacturing based economy and it is the renewal of that spirit which promises to create the tipping point of the economic vitality to come,” said Church. “It is a celebration of the growth transpiring throughout the greater Lorain County region as innovative ideas bubble up to create new businesses in high-growth industries and generate promising job opportunities for residents.”

{mosimage}“Where once we optimized our industries and organizations around quality and efficiency, today we must optimize our entire society around innovation,” said University of Akron President Luis Proenza. LCCC and Akron have developed the Innovation Alliance, a collaborative effort between the two institutions to align strengths and resources of both, accelerate educational efficiencies and spur economic development in an area between the two campuses called the Innovation Corridor.

Ohio Lt. Governor Lee Fisher, who is also Director of Development for the state, called the Center a big idea. “The main drivers of Ohio’s economy are three: knowledge, talent and innovation. They all intersect at the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center,” Fisher said.
Collaborative efforts like the Center help Ohio stay ahead of changes in the economy, he added. “Let me be clear. Staying up with the curve is as good as being behind it,” Fisher said. “We always have to be ahead of the curve… there’s an old saying that says the best way to predict the future is to create it. That’s what we’re doing here.”

The Entrepreneurship Innovation Center also has the distinction of being the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Certified facility in Lorain County. Building design and placement provides lowest impact to existing wetlands and includes natural landscaping with native Ohio and naturalized species, including blueberry bushes. Building materials and systems conserve the earth’s natural resources. As a green building, only environmentally friendly cleaning products will be used.

{mosimage}The LEED Green Building Rating System™ is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. LEED gives building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings’ performance. LEED promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection, and indoor environmental quality.

“I am always looking for ways to spur innovation in our area, create new jobs to complement those we already have, and bring new economic growth,” said Congresswoman Betty Sutton. “I am proud to support the LCCC Entrepreneurship Innovation Center because it will help us achieve these goals. This important partnership between local government, businesses, and civic organizations will be a critical resource for the new generation of innovators and small businesses that will revitalize our region.”

{mosimage}The first floor of the facility is home to Entrepreneur’s Corner presented by the Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE) in association with the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce, Lorain County Growth Partnership, North Coast Regional Chamber of Commerce, West Shore Entrepreneur’s Club, and the Entrepreneur’s Edge. This resource provides home-based business owners and traveling entrepreneurs a location to get work done on the run. Meeting rooms for 5 to 75 are fully equipped with videoconferencing, teleconferencing, multimedia stations and flexible configurations.
Also, located on the first floor are LCCC’s Entrepreneurship Innovation Institute, connecting entrepreneurs and business owners with the breadth of resources available through Lorain County Community College that can help take their idea and business to new heights.

The second floor is home to GLIDE (Great Lakes Innovation and Development Enterprise) and inside the GLIDE office space will be the Women’s Development Center as well as satellite space for the Small Business Development Center of Lorain County. GLIDE is an Edison Technology Incubator, the only one of 11 statewide that is located on a college campus. GLIDE is a partnership between the Lorain County Commissioners, the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce and LCCC.

The remaining second and third floors provide customizable space for businesses in a creative, stimulating environment, with direct access to a network of college and community resources designed to help them grow. Several companies have taken residence inside of the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center.

“Those communities that thrive in this 21st century will be those that link new technology and innovation to quality of life and sustainability. They will build upon their natural endowments,” said Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur.

State and federal awards and grants covered approximately 50 percent of the $8 million construction costs for the Entrepreneurship Innovation Center, while the remaining facility costs will be covered through lease payments paid by companies locating on the second and third floors of the building.

Some of these companies include Sooy + Co., a leading design and marketing communications agency; Clear Image Technologies, a developer of image enhancement systems and intelligent software platforms; and Banyan Technology, a technology development company that provides software solutions that increase efficiencies and effectiveness of transactional information management.


For more information on locating your business in the EIC or other business services available in the EIC, call 1-800-995-5222 (extension 4310).

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